The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Molluscum contagiosum and associations with atopic eczema in children: a retrospective longitudinal study in primary care

Molluscum contagiosum and associations with atopic eczema in children: a retrospective longitudinal study in primary care
Molluscum contagiosum and associations with atopic eczema in children: a retrospective longitudinal study in primary care
Background
Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a common skin condition in children. Consultation rates and current management in primary care, and how these have changed over time, are poorly described. An association between the presence of atopic eczema (AE) and MC has been shown, but the subsequent risk of developing MC in children with a diagnosis of AE is not known.
Aim
To describe the consultation rate and management of MC in general practice in the UK over time, and test the hypothesis that a history of AE increases the risk of developing MC in childhood.
Design and setting
Two studies are reported: a retrospective longitudinal study of MC cases and an age?sex matched case-cohort study of AE cases, both datasets being held in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink from 2004 to 2013.
Method
Data of all recorded MC and AE primary care consultations for children aged 0 to 14 years were collected and two main analyses were conducted using these data: a retrospective longitudinal analysis and an age?sex matched case-cohort analysis.
Results
The rate of MC consultations in primary care for children aged 0 to 14 years is 9.5 per 1000 (95% CI = 9.4 to 9.6). The greatest rate of consultations for both sexes is in children aged 1?4 years and 5?9 years (13.1 to 13.0 (males) and 13.0 to 13.9 (females) per 1000 respectively).
Consultation rates for MC have declined by 50% from 2004 to 2013. Children were found to be more likely to have an MC consultation if they had previously consulted a GP with AE (OR 1.13; 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.16; P
e53-e58
Olsen, Jonathan R.
fe74760c-dd70-4e65-937a-a9c883ab71d6
Piguet, Vincent
1a7fc697-331f-45c8-9fe5-f6a813084869
Gallacher, John Edward
b7f0659b-97cb-4712-a63b-1fd5e376105b
Francis, Nicholas Andrew
9b610883-605c-4fee-871d-defaa86ccf8e
Olsen, Jonathan R.
fe74760c-dd70-4e65-937a-a9c883ab71d6
Piguet, Vincent
1a7fc697-331f-45c8-9fe5-f6a813084869
Gallacher, John Edward
b7f0659b-97cb-4712-a63b-1fd5e376105b
Francis, Nicholas Andrew
9b610883-605c-4fee-871d-defaa86ccf8e

Olsen, Jonathan R., Piguet, Vincent, Gallacher, John Edward and Francis, Nicholas Andrew (2015) Molluscum contagiosum and associations with atopic eczema in children: a retrospective longitudinal study in primary care. British Journal of General Practice, 66 (642), e53-e58. (doi:10.3399/bjgp15X688093).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a common skin condition in children. Consultation rates and current management in primary care, and how these have changed over time, are poorly described. An association between the presence of atopic eczema (AE) and MC has been shown, but the subsequent risk of developing MC in children with a diagnosis of AE is not known.
Aim
To describe the consultation rate and management of MC in general practice in the UK over time, and test the hypothesis that a history of AE increases the risk of developing MC in childhood.
Design and setting
Two studies are reported: a retrospective longitudinal study of MC cases and an age?sex matched case-cohort study of AE cases, both datasets being held in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink from 2004 to 2013.
Method
Data of all recorded MC and AE primary care consultations for children aged 0 to 14 years were collected and two main analyses were conducted using these data: a retrospective longitudinal analysis and an age?sex matched case-cohort analysis.
Results
The rate of MC consultations in primary care for children aged 0 to 14 years is 9.5 per 1000 (95% CI = 9.4 to 9.6). The greatest rate of consultations for both sexes is in children aged 1?4 years and 5?9 years (13.1 to 13.0 (males) and 13.0 to 13.9 (females) per 1000 respectively).
Consultation rates for MC have declined by 50% from 2004 to 2013. Children were found to be more likely to have an MC consultation if they had previously consulted a GP with AE (OR 1.13; 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.16; P

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 June 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 December 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436079
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436079
PURE UUID: fb41d7be-f29e-4177-b9e9-330278d3cac5
ORCID for Nicholas Andrew Francis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8939-7312

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Nov 2019 17:30
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:08

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Jonathan R. Olsen
Author: Vincent Piguet
Author: John Edward Gallacher

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×