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The use of measurement systems to support patient self-management of long-term conditions: an overview of opportunities and challenges

The use of measurement systems to support patient self-management of long-term conditions: an overview of opportunities and challenges
The use of measurement systems to support patient self-management of long-term conditions: an overview of opportunities and challenges
Long-term conditions are a major public health concern that present many challenges for patients living with them. There is increasing policy focus on promoting patient self-management and supporting patients to take ownership of managing their conditions. Because long term conditions often fluctuate over time, ongoing monitoring of disease activity is necessary for self-management; this can be achieved through using Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs). PROMs can provide additional information about patients’ symptoms, functioning, and emotional wellbeing, informing clinical care for patients. Measurement systems are an innovative method to gather and report PROMs throughout a patient’s course of care, to support clinical practice and improve overall quality of care. Measurement systems are often delivered via a digital platform, which can convey patient-reported information to healthcare professionals and provide tailored self-management advice to patients, all based on information collected via PROMs. There are a number of potential benefits of this approach to self-management. Measurement systems can improve clinical practice, creating efficient clinical encounters and positively influencing patient-clinician interactions. The use of monitoring throughout a patient’s care is also thought to empower patients, by improving their knowledge of their condition, increasing their engagement with their health, and influencing their overall management of their condition. Challenges associated with using measurement systems in this way include finding appropriate PROMs, provisioning of suitable technology, and limiting the burden for patients. To increase the implementation of measurement systems into practice it is important to consider how to engage and educate healthcare professionals and patients to empower their use. Overall, adopting measurement systems into clinical practice may improve clinicians’ ability to support patient self-management of long-term conditions.
1179-271X
385-394
Holmes, Michelle, Marie
83deb057-57c5-48ec-a140-317676865ed8
Stanescu, Sabina-Claudia
ea9357e1-3371-4021-b44d-c1df840b79b3
Bishop, Felicity
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Holmes, Michelle, Marie
83deb057-57c5-48ec-a140-317676865ed8
Stanescu, Sabina-Claudia
ea9357e1-3371-4021-b44d-c1df840b79b3
Bishop, Felicity
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928

Holmes, Michelle, Marie, Stanescu, Sabina-Claudia and Bishop, Felicity (2019) The use of measurement systems to support patient self-management of long-term conditions: an overview of opportunities and challenges. Patient Related Outcome Measures, 2019 (10), 385-394. (doi:10.2147/PROM.S178488).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Long-term conditions are a major public health concern that present many challenges for patients living with them. There is increasing policy focus on promoting patient self-management and supporting patients to take ownership of managing their conditions. Because long term conditions often fluctuate over time, ongoing monitoring of disease activity is necessary for self-management; this can be achieved through using Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs). PROMs can provide additional information about patients’ symptoms, functioning, and emotional wellbeing, informing clinical care for patients. Measurement systems are an innovative method to gather and report PROMs throughout a patient’s course of care, to support clinical practice and improve overall quality of care. Measurement systems are often delivered via a digital platform, which can convey patient-reported information to healthcare professionals and provide tailored self-management advice to patients, all based on information collected via PROMs. There are a number of potential benefits of this approach to self-management. Measurement systems can improve clinical practice, creating efficient clinical encounters and positively influencing patient-clinician interactions. The use of monitoring throughout a patient’s care is also thought to empower patients, by improving their knowledge of their condition, increasing their engagement with their health, and influencing their overall management of their condition. Challenges associated with using measurement systems in this way include finding appropriate PROMs, provisioning of suitable technology, and limiting the burden for patients. To increase the implementation of measurement systems into practice it is important to consider how to engage and educate healthcare professionals and patients to empower their use. Overall, adopting measurement systems into clinical practice may improve clinicians’ ability to support patient self-management of long-term conditions.

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The use of measurement systems to support patient self-management of long-term conditions_AAM - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 December 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436177
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436177
ISSN: 1179-271X
PURE UUID: 1f400df1-e9b3-482f-a222-1411b5dcef13
ORCID for Felicity Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:08

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