The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

The influence of atmospheric circulation on surface marine temperature

The influence of atmospheric circulation on surface marine temperature
The influence of atmospheric circulation on surface marine temperature
Atmospheric circulation is an important influence on local climate, affecting meteorological variables such as temperature, precipitation, cloud cover and humidity. There are strong relationships between surface meteorology and atmospheric circulation in many areas. The extent to which these relationships can explain past climate variability however is unclear, especially over the oceans. A statistical model is developed that can capture the relationships between temperature anomalies and atmospheric circulation. This is then used to estimate the contribution of atmospheric circulation to variations in marine air temperature from as far back as 1770 until 2010. The uncertainty in the relationships is also calculated. Atmospheric circulation patterns are defined from calculations of flow direction, flow strength and average sea level pressure. Estimated and observed marine air temperature anomalies show significant correlations; especially over the northern hemisphere and mid-latitudes of the southern hemisphere. We show that atmospheric circulation has an important influence on past marine air temperature variability. The estimated marine air temperatures are also accompanied with suitable uncertainty estimates. It was concluded that atmospheric circulation is a key factor only in localised short-term climate variability and not the overall global temperature variability. The globally averaged marine air temperature estimates often have an anomaly close to zero. Other factors are more important when considering global marine temperature variability, such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and climate change. When focusing on differences between marine air temperature and sea surface temperature (SST) the climate change signal becomes less important and atmospheric circulation is the main contributor to differences seen.
University of Southampton
Harrison, Jonathan, Michael
fdf514a9-bd98-4fbc-9431-56b053cbd2fc
Harrison, Jonathan, Michael
fdf514a9-bd98-4fbc-9431-56b053cbd2fc
Kent, Elizabeth
66c11636-4b72-499b-9fa0-a2d8b1d1df52

Harrison, Jonathan, Michael (2019) The influence of atmospheric circulation on surface marine temperature. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 207pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Atmospheric circulation is an important influence on local climate, affecting meteorological variables such as temperature, precipitation, cloud cover and humidity. There are strong relationships between surface meteorology and atmospheric circulation in many areas. The extent to which these relationships can explain past climate variability however is unclear, especially over the oceans. A statistical model is developed that can capture the relationships between temperature anomalies and atmospheric circulation. This is then used to estimate the contribution of atmospheric circulation to variations in marine air temperature from as far back as 1770 until 2010. The uncertainty in the relationships is also calculated. Atmospheric circulation patterns are defined from calculations of flow direction, flow strength and average sea level pressure. Estimated and observed marine air temperature anomalies show significant correlations; especially over the northern hemisphere and mid-latitudes of the southern hemisphere. We show that atmospheric circulation has an important influence on past marine air temperature variability. The estimated marine air temperatures are also accompanied with suitable uncertainty estimates. It was concluded that atmospheric circulation is a key factor only in localised short-term climate variability and not the overall global temperature variability. The globally averaged marine air temperature estimates often have an anomaly close to zero. Other factors are more important when considering global marine temperature variability, such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and climate change. When focusing on differences between marine air temperature and sea surface temperature (SST) the climate change signal becomes less important and atmospheric circulation is the main contributor to differences seen.

Text
Harrison, Jonny_PhD_Thesis_Nov_2019 - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
Download (12MB)

More information

Published date: January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436202
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436202
PURE UUID: 70f02fdf-ec5e-4327-83dc-82c8e913d0f9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 19:00

Export record

Contributors

Author: Jonathan, Michael Harrison
Thesis advisor: Elizabeth Kent

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×