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On the limits of added-mass theory in separated flows and with varying initial conditions

On the limits of added-mass theory in separated flows and with varying initial conditions
On the limits of added-mass theory in separated flows and with varying initial conditions
It remains unclear to what extent inviscid added-mass theory accounts for the forces exerted on an accelerating body subjected to separated flow. In this study, reactant forces and velocity-field data are systematically acquired using experimental measurements and simulations of an accelerating circular flat plate. Cases accelerated from rest are compared to cases accelerated from a steady flow state. When the added-mass forces predicted by potential theory and the resistance forces associated with the instantaneous plate velocity are accounted for, the remaining (residual) forces comprise approximately 20% of the peak force, even at high accelerations. In addition, the computed residual forces during accelerations both from rest and steady-state cases yield good collapse with respect to one another, indicating that the total forces are not a strong function of the initial state of the wake. These results suggests that inviscid added-mass theory is inadequate to predict the full reactant force even in the ‘ideal’ condition of impulsive motion from rest.
0889-9746
1-11
Fernando, John N.
992e5807-04e9-4074-b476-e64cf9b2a91d
Weymouth, Gabriel
b0c85fda-dfed-44da-8cc4-9e0cc88e2ca0
Rival, David E.
87169441-f569-46d8-8add-bbdbbdc70a01
Fernando, John N.
992e5807-04e9-4074-b476-e64cf9b2a91d
Weymouth, Gabriel
b0c85fda-dfed-44da-8cc4-9e0cc88e2ca0
Rival, David E.
87169441-f569-46d8-8add-bbdbbdc70a01

Fernando, John N., Weymouth, Gabriel and Rival, David E. (2020) On the limits of added-mass theory in separated flows and with varying initial conditions. Journal of Fluids and Structures, 93, 1-11, [102835]. (doi:10.1016/j.jfluidstructs.2019.102835).

Record type: Article

Abstract

It remains unclear to what extent inviscid added-mass theory accounts for the forces exerted on an accelerating body subjected to separated flow. In this study, reactant forces and velocity-field data are systematically acquired using experimental measurements and simulations of an accelerating circular flat plate. Cases accelerated from rest are compared to cases accelerated from a steady flow state. When the added-mass forces predicted by potential theory and the resistance forces associated with the instantaneous plate velocity are accounted for, the remaining (residual) forces comprise approximately 20% of the peak force, even at high accelerations. In addition, the computed residual forces during accelerations both from rest and steady-state cases yield good collapse with respect to one another, indicating that the total forces are not a strong function of the initial state of the wake. These results suggests that inviscid added-mass theory is inadequate to predict the full reactant force even in the ‘ideal’ condition of impulsive motion from rest.

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Accepted/In Press date: 29 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 December 2019
Published date: February 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436274
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436274
ISSN: 0889-9746
PURE UUID: 0754673c-9db4-40d3-9cdd-debe03116380
ORCID for Gabriel Weymouth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5080-5016

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Date deposited: 05 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 16 May 2020 00:41

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Contributors

Author: John N. Fernando
Author: David E. Rival

University divisions

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