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From Black Pain to Rhodes Must Fall: a rejectionist perspective

From Black Pain to Rhodes Must Fall: a rejectionist perspective
From Black Pain to Rhodes Must Fall: a rejectionist perspective
Based on my study of the Rhodes Must Fall movement, I develop a rejectionist perspective by identifying the understanding and mobilization of epistemic disobedience as the core premise of such a perspective. Embedded in this contextual perspective, epistemic disobedience refers to the decolonization of the self and a fight against colonial legacies. I argue that, rather than viewing a rejectionist perspective as a threat, it should be integrated into the moral learning of contemporary institutions and businesses. This approach is important in ensuring colonial legacies and biases do not create further racism or unequal situations for marginalized groups. The implication for critical management studies is that scholars from this camp should be more sensitive to issues of black consciousness and implement an authentic pragmatic ideal to promote black culture and historiographies in universities and curricula. It also highlights a need for the field of business ethics to apply more sensitive theory of marginalized stakeholders in order to prevent any escalation of violence by multinational corporations in the name of shareholder value creation and profit-maximization.
0167-4544
Chowdhury, Rashedur
d9c0a66a-90d6-46e3-8855-945863126c30
Chowdhury, Rashedur
d9c0a66a-90d6-46e3-8855-945863126c30

Chowdhury, Rashedur (2019) From Black Pain to Rhodes Must Fall: a rejectionist perspective. Journal of Business Ethics. (doi:10.1007/s10551-019-04350-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Based on my study of the Rhodes Must Fall movement, I develop a rejectionist perspective by identifying the understanding and mobilization of epistemic disobedience as the core premise of such a perspective. Embedded in this contextual perspective, epistemic disobedience refers to the decolonization of the self and a fight against colonial legacies. I argue that, rather than viewing a rejectionist perspective as a threat, it should be integrated into the moral learning of contemporary institutions and businesses. This approach is important in ensuring colonial legacies and biases do not create further racism or unequal situations for marginalized groups. The implication for critical management studies is that scholars from this camp should be more sensitive to issues of black consciousness and implement an authentic pragmatic ideal to promote black culture and historiographies in universities and curricula. It also highlights a need for the field of business ethics to apply more sensitive theory of marginalized stakeholders in order to prevent any escalation of violence by multinational corporations in the name of shareholder value creation and profit-maximization.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 November 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436278
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436278
ISSN: 0167-4544
PURE UUID: eb6844a8-0584-436a-8737-d0d7d5ec8955
ORCID for Rashedur Chowdhury: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5118-8344

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 16 May 2020 01:00

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