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Exercise physiology: exercise performance at altitude

Exercise physiology: exercise performance at altitude
Exercise physiology: exercise performance at altitude

This review explores recent advances in the etiology of exercise intolerance (classically defined by a reduced maximal or peak oxygen uptake) in lowlanders at high altitudes, focussing on sites of physiological-system limitation and how these may differ in highlanders. The traditional opinion of impaired oxygen delivery along a convective-diffusive cascade between lungs and exercising-muscle mitochondria remains relevant but an oversimplification. Thus, developments in genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are providing an exciting, expanded perspective of exercising-muscle function. However, factors such as ascent profile, altitude sojourn, training status, ethnicity, genetics and development present interpretational challenges. Also, while animal models can be useful proxies for human function because they allow a greater degree of invasive interrogation, species differences can limit their applicability. Finally, assessment of exercise performance at altitude requires rigorous application of exercise intensity, through key demarcators such as the lactate threshold, critical power and W′ — each of which are altitude-dependent.

2468-8681
210-218
Grocott, Michael Patrick William
1e87b741-513e-4a22-be13-0f7bb344e8c2
Levett, Denny Zelda Hope
1743763a-2853-4baf-affe-6152fde8d05f
Ward, Susan Ann
e38b309e-1170-4eb3-80b3-07c1a7d406d3
Grocott, Michael Patrick William
1e87b741-513e-4a22-be13-0f7bb344e8c2
Levett, Denny Zelda Hope
1743763a-2853-4baf-affe-6152fde8d05f
Ward, Susan Ann
e38b309e-1170-4eb3-80b3-07c1a7d406d3

Grocott, Michael Patrick William, Levett, Denny Zelda Hope and Ward, Susan Ann (2019) Exercise physiology: exercise performance at altitude. Current Opinion in Physiology, 10, 210-218. (doi:10.1016/j.cophys.2019.06.008).

Record type: Review

Abstract

This review explores recent advances in the etiology of exercise intolerance (classically defined by a reduced maximal or peak oxygen uptake) in lowlanders at high altitudes, focussing on sites of physiological-system limitation and how these may differ in highlanders. The traditional opinion of impaired oxygen delivery along a convective-diffusive cascade between lungs and exercising-muscle mitochondria remains relevant but an oversimplification. Thus, developments in genomics, proteomics and metabolomics are providing an exciting, expanded perspective of exercising-muscle function. However, factors such as ascent profile, altitude sojourn, training status, ethnicity, genetics and development present interpretational challenges. Also, while animal models can be useful proxies for human function because they allow a greater degree of invasive interrogation, species differences can limit their applicability. Finally, assessment of exercise performance at altitude requires rigorous application of exercise intensity, through key demarcators such as the lactate threshold, critical power and W′ — each of which are altitude-dependent.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 26 June 2019
Published date: 1 August 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436351
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436351
ISSN: 2468-8681
PURE UUID: a4f6482e-9aab-4330-bb58-f739c6104a3b
ORCID for Michael Patrick William Grocott: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9484-7581

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Dec 2019 01:34

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