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A maternal "mixed, high sugar" dietary pattern is associated with fetal growth

A maternal "mixed, high sugar" dietary pattern is associated with fetal growth
A maternal "mixed, high sugar" dietary pattern is associated with fetal growth
This study examined associations between a maternal “mixed, high sugar” dietary pattern during pregnancy and ultrasound‐determined fetal growth in 495 urban African women and explored whether these associations were independent of maternal baseline body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG). Linear mixed effects modelling (LMM) was used to test the associations between maternal mixed, high sugar dietary pattern score, baseline BMI (kg/m2), and GWG (kg/week) and the following fetal growth outcomes: (a) biparietal diameter (cm), (b) head circumference (cm), (c) abdominal circumference (cm), and (d) femur length (cm). In the pooled LMM, a +1 standard deviation (SD) increase in the mixed, high sugar dietary pattern score was associated with higher biparietal diameter (0.03 cm/+1 SD; p = .007), head circumference (0.07 cm/+1 SD; p = .026), abdominal circumference (0.08 cm/+1 SD; p = .038), and femur length (0.02 cm/+1 SD; p = .015). Although these associations were independent of maternal BMI and GWG, higher baseline BMI was independently and positively associated with abdominal circumference (0.03 cm/+1 kg/m2; p = .011) and femur length (0.01 cm/+1 kg/m2; p = .007) and 1 kg/week greater GWG was associated with a 0.82 cm increase in abdominal circumference (p = .007). In urban African settings, where preconception maternal obesity prevalence is high and processed, high sugar diets are common, improving maternal dietary intake and BMI prior to conception should be prioritised for optimising pregnancy and birth outcomes as well as longer‐term offspring health. In addition, dietary management strategies during pregnancy may be beneficial in facilitating healthy fetal growth.
1740-8695
Wrottesley, Stephanie V.
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Prioreschi, Alessandra
04875305-6e91-4199-98bb-8154707060c4
Kehoe, Sarah
534e5729-632b-4b4f-8401-164d8c20aa26
Ward, Kathryn
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Norris, Shane A.
8e447b41-9493-4491-86bc-e7a9e72ef23b
Wrottesley, Stephanie V.
9c93c674-7f64-413d-b05e-f1c5db19c31a
Prioreschi, Alessandra
04875305-6e91-4199-98bb-8154707060c4
Kehoe, Sarah
534e5729-632b-4b4f-8401-164d8c20aa26
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Norris, Shane A.
8e447b41-9493-4491-86bc-e7a9e72ef23b

Wrottesley, Stephanie V., Prioreschi, Alessandra, Kehoe, Sarah, Ward, Kathryn and Norris, Shane A. (2019) A maternal "mixed, high sugar" dietary pattern is associated with fetal growth. Maternal & Child Nutrition, [e12912]. (doi:10.1111/mcn.12912).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study examined associations between a maternal “mixed, high sugar” dietary pattern during pregnancy and ultrasound‐determined fetal growth in 495 urban African women and explored whether these associations were independent of maternal baseline body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG). Linear mixed effects modelling (LMM) was used to test the associations between maternal mixed, high sugar dietary pattern score, baseline BMI (kg/m2), and GWG (kg/week) and the following fetal growth outcomes: (a) biparietal diameter (cm), (b) head circumference (cm), (c) abdominal circumference (cm), and (d) femur length (cm). In the pooled LMM, a +1 standard deviation (SD) increase in the mixed, high sugar dietary pattern score was associated with higher biparietal diameter (0.03 cm/+1 SD; p = .007), head circumference (0.07 cm/+1 SD; p = .026), abdominal circumference (0.08 cm/+1 SD; p = .038), and femur length (0.02 cm/+1 SD; p = .015). Although these associations were independent of maternal BMI and GWG, higher baseline BMI was independently and positively associated with abdominal circumference (0.03 cm/+1 kg/m2; p = .011) and femur length (0.01 cm/+1 kg/m2; p = .007) and 1 kg/week greater GWG was associated with a 0.82 cm increase in abdominal circumference (p = .007). In urban African settings, where preconception maternal obesity prevalence is high and processed, high sugar diets are common, improving maternal dietary intake and BMI prior to conception should be prioritised for optimising pregnancy and birth outcomes as well as longer‐term offspring health. In addition, dietary management strategies during pregnancy may be beneficial in facilitating healthy fetal growth.

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Accepted/In Press date: 18 October 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 November 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436401
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436401
ISSN: 1740-8695
PURE UUID: a46c92d5-de08-4b6f-ae6b-197341d77b79
ORCID for Sarah Kehoe: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2584-7999
ORCID for Kathryn Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750

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Date deposited: 10 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:05

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Contributors

Author: Stephanie V. Wrottesley
Author: Alessandra Prioreschi
Author: Sarah Kehoe ORCID iD
Author: Kathryn Ward ORCID iD
Author: Shane A. Norris

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