The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

A cost benefit analysis of electric vehicles - a UK case Study

A cost benefit analysis of electric vehicles - a UK case Study
A cost benefit analysis of electric vehicles - a UK case Study
Interest in electric vehicles is growing worldwide because of increasing oil prices, uncertainties concerning oil security and increased awareness of environmental issues. In this study, lifetime net present values of costs and benefits are compared between electric and fossil fuelled cars. Key questions to be answered are whether it is beneficial to purchase an electric car from a private and societal point of views. The results of the analysis show that the lifetime costs of an electric, petrol and diesel car are comparable in terms of private costs, with the cost of an electric car being slightly higher than a petrol or diesel car. However, in terms of social costs, an electric car is much more expensive than a petrol or diesel car. The high cost of batteries, long charging times and a lack of charging points are among the key issues which need to be addressed for the large scale uptake of electric vehicles. Government support is needed to promote technology developments of batteries and recharging network.
1-9
Piao, Jinan
e45bc312-b445-4b93-809a-726de0b565f6
Mcdonald, Michael
cd5b31ba-276b-41a5-879c-82bf6014db9f
Preston, Jonathan
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Piao, Jinan
e45bc312-b445-4b93-809a-726de0b565f6
Mcdonald, Michael
cd5b31ba-276b-41a5-879c-82bf6014db9f
Preston, Jonathan
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b

Piao, Jinan, Mcdonald, Michael and Preston, Jonathan (2014) A cost benefit analysis of electric vehicles - a UK case Study. Transport Research Arena (TRA) 5th Conference, , Paris, France. 14 - 27 Apr 2014. pp. 1-9 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Interest in electric vehicles is growing worldwide because of increasing oil prices, uncertainties concerning oil security and increased awareness of environmental issues. In this study, lifetime net present values of costs and benefits are compared between electric and fossil fuelled cars. Key questions to be answered are whether it is beneficial to purchase an electric car from a private and societal point of views. The results of the analysis show that the lifetime costs of an electric, petrol and diesel car are comparable in terms of private costs, with the cost of an electric car being slightly higher than a petrol or diesel car. However, in terms of social costs, an electric car is much more expensive than a petrol or diesel car. The high cost of batteries, long charging times and a lack of charging points are among the key issues which need to be addressed for the large scale uptake of electric vehicles. Government support is needed to promote technology developments of batteries and recharging network.

Text
tra2014_17738(Final submission)1 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Published date: 2014
Venue - Dates: Transport Research Arena (TRA) 5th Conference, , Paris, France, 2014-04-14 - 2014-04-27

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436452
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436452
PURE UUID: 3c98f007-b88d-44a6-9bbd-d5127931467a
ORCID for Jonathan Preston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6866-049X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 02:53

Export record

Contributors

Author: Jinan Piao

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×