The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Magnetotails in the Solar System

Magnetotails in the Solar System
Magnetotails in the Solar System

All magnetized planets in our solar system (Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) interact strongly with the solar wind and possess well developed magnetotails. It is not only the strongly magnetized planets that have magnetotails. Mars and Venus have no global intrinsic magnetic field, yet they possess induced magnetotails. Comets have magnetotails that are formed by the draping of the interplanetary magnetic field. In the case of planetary satellites (moons), the magnetotail refers to the wake region behind the satellite in the flow of either the solar wind or the magnetosphere of its parent planet. The largest magnetotail of all in our solar system is the heliotail, the "magnetotail" of the heliosphere. The variety of solar wind conditions, planetary rotation rates, ionospheric conductivity, and physical dimensions provide an outstanding opportunity to extend our understanding of the influence of these factors on magnetotail processes and structures. Volume highlights include: Discussion on why a magnetotail is a fundamental problem of magnetospheric physics. Unique collection of tutorials on a large range of magnetotails in our solar system. In-depth reviews comparing magnetotail processes at Earth with other magnetotail structures found throughout the heliosphere. Collectively, Magnetotails in the Solar System brings together for the first time in one book a collection of tutorials and current developments addressing different types of magnetotails. As a result, this book should appeal to a broad community of space scientists, and it should also be of interest to astronomers who are looking at tail-like structures beyond our solar system.

Wiley
Keiling, Andreas
8a460127-808e-48b6-9a4c-75e62cff8ee5
Jackman, Caitríona M.
9bc3456c-b254-48f1-ade0-912c5b8b4529
Delamere, Peter A.
5c567a74-7dc6-4a50-8fbe-4f6dace3bba3
Keiling, Andreas
8a460127-808e-48b6-9a4c-75e62cff8ee5
Jackman, Caitríona M.
9bc3456c-b254-48f1-ade0-912c5b8b4529
Delamere, Peter A.
5c567a74-7dc6-4a50-8fbe-4f6dace3bba3

Keiling, Andreas, Jackman, Caitríona M. and Delamere, Peter A. (2015) Magnetotails in the Solar System (Geophysical Monograph Series, , (doi:10.1002/9781118842324)), Wiley, 407pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

All magnetized planets in our solar system (Mercury, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) interact strongly with the solar wind and possess well developed magnetotails. It is not only the strongly magnetized planets that have magnetotails. Mars and Venus have no global intrinsic magnetic field, yet they possess induced magnetotails. Comets have magnetotails that are formed by the draping of the interplanetary magnetic field. In the case of planetary satellites (moons), the magnetotail refers to the wake region behind the satellite in the flow of either the solar wind or the magnetosphere of its parent planet. The largest magnetotail of all in our solar system is the heliotail, the "magnetotail" of the heliosphere. The variety of solar wind conditions, planetary rotation rates, ionospheric conductivity, and physical dimensions provide an outstanding opportunity to extend our understanding of the influence of these factors on magnetotail processes and structures. Volume highlights include: Discussion on why a magnetotail is a fundamental problem of magnetospheric physics. Unique collection of tutorials on a large range of magnetotails in our solar system. In-depth reviews comparing magnetotail processes at Earth with other magnetotail structures found throughout the heliosphere. Collectively, Magnetotails in the Solar System brings together for the first time in one book a collection of tutorials and current developments addressing different types of magnetotails. As a result, this book should appeal to a broad community of space scientists, and it should also be of interest to astronomers who are looking at tail-like structures beyond our solar system.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 9 January 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436464
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436464
PURE UUID: 2c8e4d6c-e452-4452-a5be-fffae25b1e96
ORCID for Caitríona M. Jackman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0635-7361

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Dec 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:04

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Andreas Keiling
Author: Caitríona M. Jackman ORCID iD
Author: Peter A. Delamere

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×