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Data from: Recording and reproducing the diurnal oviposition rhythms of wild populations of the soft- and stone- fruit pest Drosophila suzukii

Data from: Recording and reproducing the diurnal oviposition rhythms of wild populations of the soft- and stone- fruit pest Drosophila suzukii
Data from: Recording and reproducing the diurnal oviposition rhythms of wild populations of the soft- and stone- fruit pest Drosophila suzukii
Drosophila suzukii is a horticultural pest on a global scale which causes both yield and economic losses on a range of soft- and stone-fruit. Tackling this pest is problematic but exploiting behavioural rhythms could increase the impact of control. To do this, a better understanding of behavioural patterns is needed. Within this study we aimed to investigate rhythms in reproductive behaviour of wild D. suzukii under natural conditions in the field. Environmental parameters were also recorded to decipher how they influence these rhythms. Assays were then performed on laboratory cultures, housed under artificial conditions mimicking the temperature and light cycles, to see if these patterns were reproducible and rhythmic. We were able to promote field like oviposition patterns within the laboratory using realistic temperature and light cycles regardless of variations in other factors including substrate, humidity, and lighting type. Locomotion activity was also recorded under these mimicked conditions to identify how this behaviour interacts with oviposition rhythms. Both our field and laboratory assays show that oviposition behaviour is likely under the control of the circadian clock and primarily occurs during the day. However, consistent with prior reports we observed that these patterns become crepuscular when day-time temperature peaks exceeded 30°C. This was also found within locomotion rhythms. With an increased understanding of how these behaviours are influenced by environmental conditions, we highlight the importance of using realistic temperature and light cycles when investigating behavioural patterns. From an increased understanding of D. suzukii behaviour we increase our ability to target the pest in the field.
Wild populations, Kent, Circadian rhythms, Locomotion, Drosophlia suzukii, Semi-field, Oviposition, United Kingdom
Dryad Digital Repository
Shaw, Bethan
c214ccfc-a6fa-4e11-9a98-d6e57dfc4ed3
Fountain, Michelle
a438f506-a978-41a4-9aa8-d69bd7f98080
Wijnen, Herman
67e9bc5d-de6e-44ec-b4c2-50b67c5bc79d
Shaw, Bethan
c214ccfc-a6fa-4e11-9a98-d6e57dfc4ed3
Fountain, Michelle
a438f506-a978-41a4-9aa8-d69bd7f98080
Wijnen, Herman
67e9bc5d-de6e-44ec-b4c2-50b67c5bc79d

Shaw, Bethan, Fountain, Michelle and Wijnen, Herman (2018) Data from: Recording and reproducing the diurnal oviposition rhythms of wild populations of the soft- and stone- fruit pest Drosophila suzukii. Dryad Digital Repository doi:10.5061/DRYAD.RT714C5 [Dataset]

Record type: Dataset

Abstract

Drosophila suzukii is a horticultural pest on a global scale which causes both yield and economic losses on a range of soft- and stone-fruit. Tackling this pest is problematic but exploiting behavioural rhythms could increase the impact of control. To do this, a better understanding of behavioural patterns is needed. Within this study we aimed to investigate rhythms in reproductive behaviour of wild D. suzukii under natural conditions in the field. Environmental parameters were also recorded to decipher how they influence these rhythms. Assays were then performed on laboratory cultures, housed under artificial conditions mimicking the temperature and light cycles, to see if these patterns were reproducible and rhythmic. We were able to promote field like oviposition patterns within the laboratory using realistic temperature and light cycles regardless of variations in other factors including substrate, humidity, and lighting type. Locomotion activity was also recorded under these mimicked conditions to identify how this behaviour interacts with oviposition rhythms. Both our field and laboratory assays show that oviposition behaviour is likely under the control of the circadian clock and primarily occurs during the day. However, consistent with prior reports we observed that these patterns become crepuscular when day-time temperature peaks exceeded 30°C. This was also found within locomotion rhythms. With an increased understanding of how these behaviours are influenced by environmental conditions, we highlight the importance of using realistic temperature and light cycles when investigating behavioural patterns. From an increased understanding of D. suzukii behaviour we increase our ability to target the pest in the field.

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More information

Published date: 2018
Keywords: Wild populations, Kent, Circadian rhythms, Locomotion, Drosophlia suzukii, Semi-field, Oviposition, United Kingdom

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436519
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436519
PURE UUID: ad6ea974-8b76-4703-bae6-8ee8e1317390
ORCID for Herman Wijnen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8710-5176

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Dec 2019 17:31
Last modified: 12 Dec 2019 01:32

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Contributors

Creator: Bethan Shaw
Creator: Michelle Fountain
Creator: Herman Wijnen ORCID iD

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