The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

The Hyksos in Egypt: A bioarchaeological perspective

The Hyksos in Egypt: A bioarchaeological perspective
The Hyksos in Egypt: A bioarchaeological perspective
The term Hyksos commonly refers to the foreign dynasty that inhabited and held power in Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period, circa 1640–1530 BCE. Recent research has integrated archaeological, artistic and textual evidence, revealing the Hyksos origin and presence in Egypt more complex than previously envisioned. Answers to questions regarding the Hyksos origin (and reasons for migration), ethnic and biological homogeneity, nature of rule and impact on the Egyptian worldview are sought by the ‘Hyksos Enigma Project’. One of the research tracks is dedicated solely to the analysis of human remains.
Bioarchaeology is a subfield of archaeology focusing on the analysis of human remains in the archaeological record. Here, bioarchaeology refers to the analysis and contextualization of human remains to answer the questions of Hyksos mobility and life history. This paper focuses on methods available for the investigation of mobility from human remains to illustrate the usefulness of bioarchaeological analyses.
Mobility studies have experienced a new awakening in archaeology, caused by recent theoretical and methodological developments in both non-destructive and biochemical techniques. Ancient DNA analysis can be used to investigate both individuals and populations. Stable isotope analysis using strontium (87Sr/86Sr), oxygen (δ18O), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) act as proxies for provenance and diet. Non-destructive biodistance analysis, using dental non-metric trait analysis and geometric morphometrics, reflects morphological closeness of individuals and groups. The analysis of human remains cannot only reveal movement of the Hyksos but can increase understanding of mobility in the eastern Mediterranean.
egypt, bioarchaeology, Identity
315-320
Harrossowitz Verlag
Maaranen, Nina
6adcd01d-8455-4071-bcdf-a53253587bf2
Schutkowski, Holger
97605e77-bfc5-4424-9eca-75d5392ea7d2
Zakrzewski, Sonia
d80afd94-feff-4fe8-96e9-f3db79bba99d
Stantis, Christina
01164109-20ae-404a-963c-efdc31dd9c75
Zink, Albert
dacf05c2-df1d-413a-9f8b-fb3e54220831
Bietak, Manfred
Prell, Silvia
Maaranen, Nina
6adcd01d-8455-4071-bcdf-a53253587bf2
Schutkowski, Holger
97605e77-bfc5-4424-9eca-75d5392ea7d2
Zakrzewski, Sonia
d80afd94-feff-4fe8-96e9-f3db79bba99d
Stantis, Christina
01164109-20ae-404a-963c-efdc31dd9c75
Zink, Albert
dacf05c2-df1d-413a-9f8b-fb3e54220831
Bietak, Manfred
Prell, Silvia

Maaranen, Nina, Schutkowski, Holger, Zakrzewski, Sonia, Stantis, Christina and Zink, Albert (2019) The Hyksos in Egypt: A bioarchaeological perspective. In, Bietak, Manfred and Prell, Silvia (eds.) The Enigma of the Hyksos: Volume 1. Wiesbaden. Harrossowitz Verlag, pp. 315-320.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The term Hyksos commonly refers to the foreign dynasty that inhabited and held power in Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period, circa 1640–1530 BCE. Recent research has integrated archaeological, artistic and textual evidence, revealing the Hyksos origin and presence in Egypt more complex than previously envisioned. Answers to questions regarding the Hyksos origin (and reasons for migration), ethnic and biological homogeneity, nature of rule and impact on the Egyptian worldview are sought by the ‘Hyksos Enigma Project’. One of the research tracks is dedicated solely to the analysis of human remains.
Bioarchaeology is a subfield of archaeology focusing on the analysis of human remains in the archaeological record. Here, bioarchaeology refers to the analysis and contextualization of human remains to answer the questions of Hyksos mobility and life history. This paper focuses on methods available for the investigation of mobility from human remains to illustrate the usefulness of bioarchaeological analyses.
Mobility studies have experienced a new awakening in archaeology, caused by recent theoretical and methodological developments in both non-destructive and biochemical techniques. Ancient DNA analysis can be used to investigate both individuals and populations. Stable isotope analysis using strontium (87Sr/86Sr), oxygen (δ18O), carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) act as proxies for provenance and diet. Non-destructive biodistance analysis, using dental non-metric trait analysis and geometric morphometrics, reflects morphological closeness of individuals and groups. The analysis of human remains cannot only reveal movement of the Hyksos but can increase understanding of mobility in the eastern Mediterranean.

Text
N. Maaranen1_03.10.19 - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: 1 December 2019
Keywords: egypt, bioarchaeology, Identity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 436780
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/436780
PURE UUID: 31c27b97-a7cb-4c68-8438-8269b2a3ff5e
ORCID for Sonia Zakrzewski: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1796-065X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Jan 2020 17:33
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 02:49

Export record

Contributors

Author: Nina Maaranen
Author: Holger Schutkowski
Author: Christina Stantis
Author: Albert Zink
Editor: Manfred Bietak
Editor: Silvia Prell

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×