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Exploring the relationships between pedestrian behaviours and traffic safety attitudes in six countries

Exploring the relationships between pedestrian behaviours and traffic safety attitudes in six countries
Exploring the relationships between pedestrian behaviours and traffic safety attitudes in six countries
The majority of cross-cultural research on traffic safety has investigated driver behaviour, yet in most low- and middle-income countries, where the weight of the road fatality burden is felt, motorisation rates are significantly lower than in higher-income countries. As such, this approach necessarily excludes large parts of the populations in those settings. In order to investigate the link between traffic safety attitudes and road user behaviours, this study used a self-report measure of pedestrian behaviour, applying it in six countries; Bangladesh, China, Kenya, Thailand, the UK, and Vietnam. Focus was on the relationships between a respondent’s attitude towards risky or rule violating on-road behaviours (of other road users, or more generally, not specific to pedestrians), and the extent to which they reported performing three types of risky pedestrian behaviours (i.e., intentional rule violations, errors in judgement or memory, and aggressive behaviours). Data from a sample of 3,423 individuals was subjected to a series of regression models, revealing significant links between attitudes and pedestrian behaviours in all countries, in all three behavioural factors, after controlling for age, gender, and exposure to the road environment. Differences were found between countries in the strength of these relationships, with weaker connections between attitudes and behaviours in Kenya, and stronger connections in China (with other countries in-between the two). Results are discussed in terms of the need to understand the relationships between social cognitive constructs in the specific country in which a road safety intervention is intended to be implemented.
Pedestrian behaviour, traffic safety attitudes, low- and middle-income countries, questionnaire survey
1369-8478
Mcilroy, Rich C.
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Nam, Vũ Hoài
853aac12-1a8f-4520-be2a-af6985e224e1
Bunyasi, Brenda W.
bf489de3-637f-40c7-bb34-7ae4f2b1387f
Jikyong, Usanisa
dd5b6098-0a29-4874-86f3-26c112401306
Kokwaro, Gilbert O.
f1f598fa-e2f2-42a6-976b-d250360282b4
Wu, Jianping
db314ad9-d011-4c77-9ae1-b190f82fd013
Hoque, Md. Shamsul
a73d71c3-c368-4715-af13-2098f794383c
Plant, Katherine L.
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78
Preston, John M.
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Mcilroy, Rich C.
68e56daa-5b0b-477e-a643-3c7b78c1b85d
Nam, Vũ Hoài
853aac12-1a8f-4520-be2a-af6985e224e1
Bunyasi, Brenda W.
bf489de3-637f-40c7-bb34-7ae4f2b1387f
Jikyong, Usanisa
dd5b6098-0a29-4874-86f3-26c112401306
Kokwaro, Gilbert O.
f1f598fa-e2f2-42a6-976b-d250360282b4
Wu, Jianping
db314ad9-d011-4c77-9ae1-b190f82fd013
Hoque, Md. Shamsul
a73d71c3-c368-4715-af13-2098f794383c
Plant, Katherine L.
3638555a-f2ca-4539-962c-422686518a78
Preston, John M.
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Mcilroy, Rich C., Nam, Vũ Hoài, Bunyasi, Brenda W., Jikyong, Usanisa, Kokwaro, Gilbert O., Wu, Jianping, Hoque, Md. Shamsul, Plant, Katherine L., Preston, John M. and Stanton, Neville A. (2019) Exploring the relationships between pedestrian behaviours and traffic safety attitudes in six countries. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour. (doi:10.1016/j.trf.2019.11.006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The majority of cross-cultural research on traffic safety has investigated driver behaviour, yet in most low- and middle-income countries, where the weight of the road fatality burden is felt, motorisation rates are significantly lower than in higher-income countries. As such, this approach necessarily excludes large parts of the populations in those settings. In order to investigate the link between traffic safety attitudes and road user behaviours, this study used a self-report measure of pedestrian behaviour, applying it in six countries; Bangladesh, China, Kenya, Thailand, the UK, and Vietnam. Focus was on the relationships between a respondent’s attitude towards risky or rule violating on-road behaviours (of other road users, or more generally, not specific to pedestrians), and the extent to which they reported performing three types of risky pedestrian behaviours (i.e., intentional rule violations, errors in judgement or memory, and aggressive behaviours). Data from a sample of 3,423 individuals was subjected to a series of regression models, revealing significant links between attitudes and pedestrian behaviours in all countries, in all three behavioural factors, after controlling for age, gender, and exposure to the road environment. Differences were found between countries in the strength of these relationships, with weaker connections between attitudes and behaviours in Kenya, and stronger connections in China (with other countries in-between the two). Results are discussed in terms of the need to understand the relationships between social cognitive constructs in the specific country in which a road safety intervention is intended to be implemented.

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McIlroy et al. 2020 Attitudes author manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 November 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 November 2019
Keywords: Pedestrian behaviour, traffic safety attitudes, low- and middle-income countries, questionnaire survey

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437013
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437013
ISSN: 1369-8478
PURE UUID: 964c933e-8df9-45a8-9142-0f12bdeab535
ORCID for Rich C. Mcilroy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0326-8101
ORCID for Katherine L. Plant: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4532-2818
ORCID for John M. Preston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6866-049X
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jan 2020 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:53

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Contributors

Author: Rich C. Mcilroy ORCID iD
Author: Vũ Hoài Nam
Author: Brenda W. Bunyasi
Author: Usanisa Jikyong
Author: Gilbert O. Kokwaro
Author: Jianping Wu
Author: Md. Shamsul Hoque
Author: John M. Preston ORCID iD

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