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NAFLD as a driver of chronic kidney disease

NAFLD as a driver of chronic kidney disease
NAFLD as a driver of chronic kidney disease
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two worldwide public health problems, affecting up to 25-30% (NAFLD), and up to 10-15% (CKD) of the general population. Recently, it has also become established that there is a strong association between NAFLD and CKD, regardless of the presence of potential confounding diseases such as obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Since NAFLD and CKD are two common diseases and both conditions often occur with other metabolic conditions, such as T2DM or metabolic syndrome (MetS), elucidating the relative impact of NAFLD on risk of incident CKD presents a substantial challenge to investigators working in this research field. A growing body of epidemiological evidence to date suggests that NAFLD is an independent risk factor for CKD and recent evidence also suggests that associated factors such as MetS, dysbiosis, unhealthy diets, platelet activation and processes associated with ageing could also contribute mechanisms linking NAFLD and CKD. This narrative review provides an overview of the literature on: a) the evidence for an association and causal link between NAFLD and CKD and b) the underlying mechanisms by which NAFLD (and factors strongly linked with NAFLD) may increase risk of developing CKD.
Adipose tissue, CKD, Dysbiosis, Gut microbiota, Insulin resistance, Metabolic syndrome, Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Type 2 diabetes
0168-8278
785-801
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Targher, Giovanni
043e0811-b389-4922-974e-22e650212c5f
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Targher, Giovanni
043e0811-b389-4922-974e-22e650212c5f

Byrne, Christopher and Targher, Giovanni (2020) NAFLD as a driver of chronic kidney disease. Journal of Hepatology, 72 (4), 785-801. (doi:10.1016/j.jhep.2020.01.013).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two worldwide public health problems, affecting up to 25-30% (NAFLD), and up to 10-15% (CKD) of the general population. Recently, it has also become established that there is a strong association between NAFLD and CKD, regardless of the presence of potential confounding diseases such as obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Since NAFLD and CKD are two common diseases and both conditions often occur with other metabolic conditions, such as T2DM or metabolic syndrome (MetS), elucidating the relative impact of NAFLD on risk of incident CKD presents a substantial challenge to investigators working in this research field. A growing body of epidemiological evidence to date suggests that NAFLD is an independent risk factor for CKD and recent evidence also suggests that associated factors such as MetS, dysbiosis, unhealthy diets, platelet activation and processes associated with ageing could also contribute mechanisms linking NAFLD and CKD. This narrative review provides an overview of the literature on: a) the evidence for an association and causal link between NAFLD and CKD and b) the underlying mechanisms by which NAFLD (and factors strongly linked with NAFLD) may increase risk of developing CKD.

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JHEPAT D 9-01937_R2 Byrne Targher - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 January 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 February 2020
Published date: 1 April 2020
Keywords: Adipose tissue, CKD, Dysbiosis, Gut microbiota, Insulin resistance, Metabolic syndrome, Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Type 2 diabetes

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437182
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437182
ISSN: 0168-8278
PURE UUID: b74eb8a2-0186-42ce-bf71-c4bae3cefa63
ORCID for Christopher Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jan 2020 17:32
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 06:11

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Author: Giovanni Targher

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