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Increased plasma CD14 levels 1 year postpartum in women with pre-eclampsia during pregnancy: a case–control plasma proteomics study

Increased plasma CD14 levels 1 year postpartum in women with pre-eclampsia during pregnancy: a case–control plasma proteomics study
Increased plasma CD14 levels 1 year postpartum in women with pre-eclampsia during pregnancy: a case–control plasma proteomics study
Epidemiological data suggest that pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with an increased risk of post-delivery metabolic dysregulation. The aim of the present case–control observational study was to examine the global plasma proteomic profile 1 year postpartum in women who developed PE during pregnancy (n = 5) compared to controls (n = 5), in order to identify a novel predictive marker linking PE with long-term metabolic imbalance. Key findings were verified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a separate cohort (n = 17 women with PE and n = 43 controls). One hundred and seventy-two proteins were differentially expressed in the PE vs. control groups. Gene ontology analysis showed that Inflammatory|Immune responses, Blood coagulation and Metabolism were significantly enriched terms. CD14, mapping to the inflammatory response protein network, was selected for verification based on bibliographic evidence. ELISA measurements showed CD14 to be significantly increased 1 year postpartum in women with PE during pregnancy compared to controls [PE group (median ± SD): 296.5 ± 113.6; control group (median ± SD): 128.9 ± 98.5; Mann–Whitney U test p = 0.0078]. Overall, the identified proteins could provide insight into the long-term disease risk among women with PE during pregnancy and highlight the need for their postpartum monitoring. CD14 could be examined in larger cohorts as a predictive marker of insulin resistance and type II diabetes mellitus among women with PE.
2044-4052
1-5
Manousopoulou, Antigoni
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Abad, Fatma.S.H.
46a6b496-747d-42af-8cdc-ff01964485fd
Garay-Baquero, Diana J.
99f41e60-8617-4b5e-b519-ec18dfce3085
Birch, Brian
8a94cd36-d429-4ab4-82a6-a376b4d4e10f
van Rijn, Bas B.
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El Wilid, Bashir
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Garbis, Spiros
7067fd19-50c9-4d42-9611-f370289470bd
Manousopoulou, Antigoni
37a53b6b-dba9-4805-8c7a-14a64aebc711
Abad, Fatma.S.H.
46a6b496-747d-42af-8cdc-ff01964485fd
Garay-Baquero, Diana J.
99f41e60-8617-4b5e-b519-ec18dfce3085
Birch, Brian
8a94cd36-d429-4ab4-82a6-a376b4d4e10f
van Rijn, Bas B.
f5b6bd81-2421-416d-b9a9-9c0857e94e6a
El Wilid, Bashir
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Garbis, Spiros
7067fd19-50c9-4d42-9611-f370289470bd

Manousopoulou, Antigoni, Abad, Fatma.S.H., Garay-Baquero, Diana J., Birch, Brian, van Rijn, Bas B., El Wilid, Bashir and Garbis, Spiros (2020) Increased plasma CD14 levels 1 year postpartum in women with pre-eclampsia during pregnancy: a case–control plasma proteomics study. Nutrition & Diabetes, 10 (2), 1-5, [2]. (doi:10.1038/s41387-019-0105-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Epidemiological data suggest that pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with an increased risk of post-delivery metabolic dysregulation. The aim of the present case–control observational study was to examine the global plasma proteomic profile 1 year postpartum in women who developed PE during pregnancy (n = 5) compared to controls (n = 5), in order to identify a novel predictive marker linking PE with long-term metabolic imbalance. Key findings were verified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a separate cohort (n = 17 women with PE and n = 43 controls). One hundred and seventy-two proteins were differentially expressed in the PE vs. control groups. Gene ontology analysis showed that Inflammatory|Immune responses, Blood coagulation and Metabolism were significantly enriched terms. CD14, mapping to the inflammatory response protein network, was selected for verification based on bibliographic evidence. ELISA measurements showed CD14 to be significantly increased 1 year postpartum in women with PE during pregnancy compared to controls [PE group (median ± SD): 296.5 ± 113.6; control group (median ± SD): 128.9 ± 98.5; Mann–Whitney U test p = 0.0078]. Overall, the identified proteins could provide insight into the long-term disease risk among women with PE during pregnancy and highlight the need for their postpartum monitoring. CD14 could be examined in larger cohorts as a predictive marker of insulin resistance and type II diabetes mellitus among women with PE.

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Nature_s41387-019-0105-x - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 January 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437183
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437183
ISSN: 2044-4052
PURE UUID: 48adaafd-b449-4311-8f34-7f7deb94e2c5
ORCID for Spiros Garbis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1050-0805

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Jan 2020 17:32
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 02:57

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Contributors

Author: Antigoni Manousopoulou
Author: Fatma.S.H. Abad
Author: Diana J. Garay-Baquero
Author: Brian Birch
Author: Bas B. van Rijn
Author: Bashir El Wilid
Author: Spiros Garbis ORCID iD

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