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Rotaxanes as ligands for transition metals

Rotaxanes as ligands for transition metals
Rotaxanes as ligands for transition metals
Mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) have been attracting increasing interest since their emergence in the 1960s. The development of passive template and active template synthetic approaches facilitated the rapid growth in synthesis of various functionalised mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), allowing for a wide range of applications.

In this thesis, Chapter 1 will discuss the synthetic methodologies from earliest statistical methods to passive templates and the latest active templates. Amongst the active template methodologies, the Cu catalysed alkyne azide cycloaddition (AT-CuAAC), together with its introduction, mechanistic studies as well as its application in syntheses of various functionalised rotaxanes will be presented. Chapter 2 will illustrate the discovery of an unexpected dinuclear Cu(I) complex during the investigation of an AT-CuAAC reaction and its selective demetallation. Chapter 3 highlights the important role of the mechanical geometry on stabilising a Pt(II) centre in ligand substitution reactions and oxidation reactions. Finally, Chapter 4 reports the synthesis of two Pt based chiral rotaxanes where the ultimate aim is to investigate these complexes as emitters of circularly polarized light (CPL) for OLED applications.
University of Southampton
Zhang, Zhihui
57097735-da7b-48b8-a815-b3da868d142e
Zhang, Zhihui
57097735-da7b-48b8-a815-b3da868d142e
Goldup, Stephen
0a93eedd-98bb-42c1-a963-e2815665e937

Zhang, Zhihui (2019) Rotaxanes as ligands for transition metals. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 310pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) have been attracting increasing interest since their emergence in the 1960s. The development of passive template and active template synthetic approaches facilitated the rapid growth in synthesis of various functionalised mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), allowing for a wide range of applications.

In this thesis, Chapter 1 will discuss the synthetic methodologies from earliest statistical methods to passive templates and the latest active templates. Amongst the active template methodologies, the Cu catalysed alkyne azide cycloaddition (AT-CuAAC), together with its introduction, mechanistic studies as well as its application in syntheses of various functionalised rotaxanes will be presented. Chapter 2 will illustrate the discovery of an unexpected dinuclear Cu(I) complex during the investigation of an AT-CuAAC reaction and its selective demetallation. Chapter 3 highlights the important role of the mechanical geometry on stabilising a Pt(II) centre in ligand substitution reactions and oxidation reactions. Finally, Chapter 4 reports the synthesis of two Pt based chiral rotaxanes where the ultimate aim is to investigate these complexes as emitters of circularly polarized light (CPL) for OLED applications.

Text
Thesis for Award Zhihui Zhang 28078063_2 - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 October 2021.
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

More information

Published date: August 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437263
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437263
PURE UUID: 000db449-8bc1-45b8-902f-dc642006576e
ORCID for Stephen Goldup: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3781-0464

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Jan 2020 17:34
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:47

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Contributors

Author: Zhihui Zhang
Thesis advisor: Stephen Goldup ORCID iD

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