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Freeform fabrication of nanobiomaterials using 3D

Freeform fabrication of nanobiomaterials using 3D
Freeform fabrication of nanobiomaterials using 3D
Recent advances on nanotechnology have created new frontiers, terminologies, and possibilities that have led to breakthroughs in several distinct and multidisciplinary sciences. In particular, recent developments in the field of nanobiotechnology have significantly improved the area of nanomedicine, biomedical, and healthcare sciences. Conventional biomedical applications have taken advantage of nanotechnology science in different areas such as intelligent systems, controlled-release systems, tissue engineering (TE), biosensors, and nanocomposites used in orthopaedic implants (Bartolo and Bidanda 2008). Unique and useful characteristics over conventional materials have been observed from nanobiomaterials due to the size and surface effects that can be employed in various medical applications. Improved reactivity, bioactivity, electrical and optical properties, strength, and magnetic characteristics are of particular interest to the biomedical field (Ferrari, 2005; Qin et al., 1999; Vasir et al., 2005). Moreover, there is the possibility of controlling some other properties such as melting point and solubility of nanobiomaterials by altering their particle size. Nanofillers such as nanofibers and nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely presented in different biomedical fields with new applications in mind. Polymeric nanofibers with unique and intrinsic properties, resulting from their high surface area–to–volume ratio, are attractive for many practical applications, and intensive studies have been conducted on this class of nanobiomaterials (Hasirci et al., 2006; Huang et al., 2003; Zhang et al., 2005). It has been observed that human cells tend to attach …
41-92
Woodhead Publishing
Vaezi, Mohammad
e2c61050-782f-427f-9499-d5cd1e5fef91
Yang, Shoufeng
e0018adf-8123-4a54-b8dd-306c10ca48f1
Narayan, Roger
Vaezi, Mohammad
e2c61050-782f-427f-9499-d5cd1e5fef91
Yang, Shoufeng
e0018adf-8123-4a54-b8dd-306c10ca48f1
Narayan, Roger

Vaezi, Mohammad and Yang, Shoufeng (2020) Freeform fabrication of nanobiomaterials using 3D. In, Narayan, Roger (ed.) Rapid Prototyping of Biomaterials: Techniques in Additive Manufacturing. (Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials) 2nd ed. Woodhead Publishing, pp. 41-92.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Recent advances on nanotechnology have created new frontiers, terminologies, and possibilities that have led to breakthroughs in several distinct and multidisciplinary sciences. In particular, recent developments in the field of nanobiotechnology have significantly improved the area of nanomedicine, biomedical, and healthcare sciences. Conventional biomedical applications have taken advantage of nanotechnology science in different areas such as intelligent systems, controlled-release systems, tissue engineering (TE), biosensors, and nanocomposites used in orthopaedic implants (Bartolo and Bidanda 2008). Unique and useful characteristics over conventional materials have been observed from nanobiomaterials due to the size and surface effects that can be employed in various medical applications. Improved reactivity, bioactivity, electrical and optical properties, strength, and magnetic characteristics are of particular interest to the biomedical field (Ferrari, 2005; Qin et al., 1999; Vasir et al., 2005). Moreover, there is the possibility of controlling some other properties such as melting point and solubility of nanobiomaterials by altering their particle size. Nanofillers such as nanofibers and nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely presented in different biomedical fields with new applications in mind. Polymeric nanofibers with unique and intrinsic properties, resulting from their high surface area–to–volume ratio, are attractive for many practical applications, and intensive studies have been conducted on this class of nanobiomaterials (Hasirci et al., 2006; Huang et al., 2003; Zhang et al., 2005). It has been observed that human cells tend to attach …

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 25 October 2019
Published date: 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437354
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437354
PURE UUID: e231d1ee-3a35-4fc0-8dab-dfe2e3f9430c
ORCID for Shoufeng Yang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3888-3211

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2020 17:32
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Mohammad Vaezi
Author: Shoufeng Yang ORCID iD
Editor: Roger Narayan

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