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“Could be a risk couldn’t it”: Decision-making, access to, and the use of functional objects for people with a dementia living in a care home

“Could be a risk couldn’t it”: Decision-making, access to, and the use of functional objects for people with a dementia living in a care home
“Could be a risk couldn’t it”: Decision-making, access to, and the use of functional objects for people with a dementia living in a care home
It is argued the use of functional objects and control over personal possessions are important in supporting, maintaining and cultivating identities. By exploring how objects manifest in the everyday lives of people with a dementia in care homes, this thesis focuses on the interactive nature of human and material worlds, often neglected in care home studies.

This ethnographic study included a hanging out period, participant-observations, object-elicitation interviews, in-depth interviews and the examination of documentary sources. I explored who was involved in decision-making relating to personal possessions, who had access to functional objects, how functional objects were used, and by whom. Finally, I examined whether social citizenship was a useful lens to explore such relations.

The study findings are that, people with a dementia are excluded from decision-making relating to personal possessions and the future acquisition of objects, they lacked control over their possessions, had few opportunities to use functional objects, were often denied access to functional objects without a formal risk assessment, and had belongings removed from their rooms without their knowledge or agreement. By viewing object-person relations in dementia care through a citizenship lens, the material citizenship framework was developed. The material citizenship framework has the potential to support a rights-based approach to dementia care by using functional objects as an enabler to balance risk management and protection, and empowerment and social citizenship. I argue that object-person relations are important to the advancement of dementia care and citizenship practices.
University of Southampton
Lee, Kellyn
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Lee, Kellyn
6c8c3a3e-f987-4ca0-b1a6-466afeeb399c
Bartlett, Ruth
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Luff, Rebekah
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Lee, Kellyn (2019) “Could be a risk couldn’t it”: Decision-making, access to, and the use of functional objects for people with a dementia living in a care home. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 263pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

It is argued the use of functional objects and control over personal possessions are important in supporting, maintaining and cultivating identities. By exploring how objects manifest in the everyday lives of people with a dementia in care homes, this thesis focuses on the interactive nature of human and material worlds, often neglected in care home studies.

This ethnographic study included a hanging out period, participant-observations, object-elicitation interviews, in-depth interviews and the examination of documentary sources. I explored who was involved in decision-making relating to personal possessions, who had access to functional objects, how functional objects were used, and by whom. Finally, I examined whether social citizenship was a useful lens to explore such relations.

The study findings are that, people with a dementia are excluded from decision-making relating to personal possessions and the future acquisition of objects, they lacked control over their possessions, had few opportunities to use functional objects, were often denied access to functional objects without a formal risk assessment, and had belongings removed from their rooms without their knowledge or agreement. By viewing object-person relations in dementia care through a citizenship lens, the material citizenship framework was developed. The material citizenship framework has the potential to support a rights-based approach to dementia care by using functional objects as an enabler to balance risk management and protection, and empowerment and social citizenship. I argue that object-person relations are important to the advancement of dementia care and citizenship practices.

Text
Kellyn Lee Final Thesis 9-10-2019 - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: October 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437364
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437364
PURE UUID: 74867d8e-8c9a-4675-b6a0-6460022d1fa1
ORCID for Ruth Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3412-2300
ORCID for Rebekah Luff: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7871-0246

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2020 17:33
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:44

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Contributors

Author: Kellyn Lee
Thesis advisor: Ruth Bartlett ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Rebekah Luff ORCID iD

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