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The role of floridoside in osmoadaptation of coral-associated algal endosymbionts to high-salinity conditions

The role of floridoside in osmoadaptation of coral-associated algal endosymbionts to high-salinity conditions
The role of floridoside in osmoadaptation of coral-associated algal endosymbionts to high-salinity conditions
The endosymbiosis between Symbiodinium dinoflagellates and stony corals provides the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. The survival of these ecosystems is under threat at a global scale, and better knowledge is needed to conceive strategies for mitigating future reef loss. Environmental disturbance imposing temperature, salinity, and nutrient stress can lead to the loss of the Symbiodinium partner, causing so-called coral bleaching. Some of the most thermotolerant coral-Symbiodinium associations occur in the Persian/Arabian Gulf and the Red Sea, which also represent the most saline coral habitats. We studied whether Symbiodinium alter their metabolite content in response to high-salinity environments. We found that Symbiodinium cells exposed to high salinity produced high levels of the osmolyte 2-O-glycerol-α-d-galactopyranoside (floridoside), both in vitro and in their coral host animals, thereby increasing their capacity and, putatively, the capacity of the holobiont to cope with the effects of osmotic stress in extreme environments. Given that floridoside has been previously shown to also act as an antioxidant, this osmolyte may serve a dual function: first, to serve as a compatible organic osmolyte accumulated by Symbiodinium in response to elevated salinities and, second, to counter reactive oxygen species produced as a consequence of potential salinity and heat stress.
2375-2548
Ochsenkühn, Michael A.
f8ceb368-5885-4317-b1e5-1e5aa61abd78
Röthig, Till
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D'angelo, Cecilia
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Wiedenmann, Jörg
ad445af2-680f-4927-90b3-589ac9d538f7
Voolstra, Christian R.
e9c8ec10-db0a-40a2-805b-2cfadfbd55cd
Ochsenkühn, Michael A.
f8ceb368-5885-4317-b1e5-1e5aa61abd78
Röthig, Till
d64eb877-b3cf-4906-aaaf-f797056372db
D'angelo, Cecilia
0d35b03b-684d-43aa-a57a-87212ab07ee1
Wiedenmann, Jörg
ad445af2-680f-4927-90b3-589ac9d538f7
Voolstra, Christian R.
e9c8ec10-db0a-40a2-805b-2cfadfbd55cd

Ochsenkühn, Michael A., Röthig, Till, D'angelo, Cecilia, Wiedenmann, Jörg and Voolstra, Christian R. (2017) The role of floridoside in osmoadaptation of coral-associated algal endosymbionts to high-salinity conditions. Science Advances, 3 (8), [e1602047]. (doi:10.1126/sciadv.1602047).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The endosymbiosis between Symbiodinium dinoflagellates and stony corals provides the foundation of coral reef ecosystems. The survival of these ecosystems is under threat at a global scale, and better knowledge is needed to conceive strategies for mitigating future reef loss. Environmental disturbance imposing temperature, salinity, and nutrient stress can lead to the loss of the Symbiodinium partner, causing so-called coral bleaching. Some of the most thermotolerant coral-Symbiodinium associations occur in the Persian/Arabian Gulf and the Red Sea, which also represent the most saline coral habitats. We studied whether Symbiodinium alter their metabolite content in response to high-salinity environments. We found that Symbiodinium cells exposed to high salinity produced high levels of the osmolyte 2-O-glycerol-α-d-galactopyranoside (floridoside), both in vitro and in their coral host animals, thereby increasing their capacity and, putatively, the capacity of the holobiont to cope with the effects of osmotic stress in extreme environments. Given that floridoside has been previously shown to also act as an antioxidant, this osmolyte may serve a dual function: first, to serve as a compatible organic osmolyte accumulated by Symbiodinium in response to elevated salinities and, second, to counter reactive oxygen species produced as a consequence of potential salinity and heat stress.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 August 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437435
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437435
ISSN: 2375-2548
PURE UUID: 64e0a5ab-363c-4577-a6ee-1bc95e2b9924
ORCID for Jörg Wiedenmann: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2128-2943

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Date deposited: 30 Jan 2020 17:36
Last modified: 13 Nov 2021 02:45

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Contributors

Author: Michael A. Ochsenkühn
Author: Till Röthig
Author: Christian R. Voolstra

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