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Electro-haptic enhancement of spatial hearing in cochlear implant users

Electro-haptic enhancement of spatial hearing in cochlear implant users
Electro-haptic enhancement of spatial hearing in cochlear implant users
Cochlear implants (CIs) have enabled hundreds of thousands of profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds by electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. However, CI users are often very poor at locating sounds, which leads to impaired sound segregation and threat detection. We provided missing spatial hearing cues through haptic stimulation to augment the electrical CI signal. We found that this “electro-haptic” stimulation dramatically improved sound localization. Furthermore, participants were able to effectively integrate spatial information transmitted through these two senses, performing better with combined audio and haptic stimulation than with either alone. Our haptic signal was presented to the wrists and could readily be delivered by a low-cost wearable device. This approach could provide a non-invasive means of improving outcomes for the vast majority of CI users who have only one implant, without the expense and risk of a second implantation.
2045-2322
Fletcher, Mark
ac11588a-fafe-4dbb-8b3c-80a6ff030546
Cunningham, Robyn
a3adff43-40a0-4152-9488-66b92a602a88
Mills, Sean
7d497d49-f9bb-422e-b283-dce2a84de5fb
Fletcher, Mark
ac11588a-fafe-4dbb-8b3c-80a6ff030546
Cunningham, Robyn
a3adff43-40a0-4152-9488-66b92a602a88
Mills, Sean
7d497d49-f9bb-422e-b283-dce2a84de5fb

Fletcher, Mark, Cunningham, Robyn and Mills, Sean (2020) Electro-haptic enhancement of spatial hearing in cochlear implant users. Scientific Reports, 10, [1621]. (doi:10.1038/s41598-020-58503-8).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cochlear implants (CIs) have enabled hundreds of thousands of profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds by electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. However, CI users are often very poor at locating sounds, which leads to impaired sound segregation and threat detection. We provided missing spatial hearing cues through haptic stimulation to augment the electrical CI signal. We found that this “electro-haptic” stimulation dramatically improved sound localization. Furthermore, participants were able to effectively integrate spatial information transmitted through these two senses, performing better with combined audio and haptic stimulation than with either alone. Our haptic signal was presented to the wrists and could readily be delivered by a low-cost wearable device. This approach could provide a non-invasive means of improving outcomes for the vast majority of CI users who have only one implant, without the expense and risk of a second implantation.

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s41598-020-58503-8 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 15 January 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 January 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437462
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437462
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: 4f012c69-0928-42d2-9737-0f44a55434d0
ORCID for Sean Mills: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7866-7225

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Jan 2020 17:30
Last modified: 27 Mar 2020 01:37

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Contributors

Author: Mark Fletcher
Author: Robyn Cunningham
Author: Sean Mills ORCID iD

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