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English as a lingua franca and transcultural communication: rethinking competences and pedagogy for ELT

English as a lingua franca and transcultural communication: rethinking competences and pedagogy for ELT
English as a lingua franca and transcultural communication: rethinking competences and pedagogy for ELT
Research into global uses of English, and particularly ELF (English
as a Lingua Franca), has highlighted the diversity and fluidity of communicative practices in intercultural and transcultural communication through English. Successful intercultural/transcultural communication involves the ability to make use of and negotiate multilingual/plurilingual linguistic resources, a variety of communicative practices and strategies, and movement between global, national, local, and emergent frames of reference. This is a very different conception of competence to that typically is utilised in English language teaching (ELT) with its pre-determined ‘code’ consisting
of a restricted range of grammatical, lexical, and phonological forms and minimal concern with the sociocultural dimension of communication. The need for a reconceptualisation of language in applied linguistics and more recently ELT has begun to receive serious scholarly attention. However, this needs to be accompanied by a focus on the wider intercultural and transcultural communicative practices in which language is embedded and enmeshed. This entails recognition of the central place of intercultural competence and the awareness that is necessary to manage such complexity, variation, and fluidity in communication. As such, this chapter addresses Hall and Wicaksono’s (this volume) call to interrogate and be “explicit about what we, as applied linguists, think English is—our ontologies of English—and how these ontologies underpin our educational ideologies and professional practices”, with a particular focus on the intercultural and transcultural dimensions to both English use and education policy and practice.
253-272
Cambridge University Press
Baker, William
9f1b758c-e6e0-43ca-b7bf-a0d5e1387d10
Christopher, Hall
Wicaksono, Rachel
Baker, William
9f1b758c-e6e0-43ca-b7bf-a0d5e1387d10
Christopher, Hall
Wicaksono, Rachel

Baker, William (2020) English as a lingua franca and transcultural communication: rethinking competences and pedagogy for ELT. In, Christopher, Hall and Wicaksono, Rachel (eds.) Ontologies of English: Conceptualising the Language for Learning, Teaching, and Assessment. Cambridge University Press, pp. 253-272.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Research into global uses of English, and particularly ELF (English
as a Lingua Franca), has highlighted the diversity and fluidity of communicative practices in intercultural and transcultural communication through English. Successful intercultural/transcultural communication involves the ability to make use of and negotiate multilingual/plurilingual linguistic resources, a variety of communicative practices and strategies, and movement between global, national, local, and emergent frames of reference. This is a very different conception of competence to that typically is utilised in English language teaching (ELT) with its pre-determined ‘code’ consisting
of a restricted range of grammatical, lexical, and phonological forms and minimal concern with the sociocultural dimension of communication. The need for a reconceptualisation of language in applied linguistics and more recently ELT has begun to receive serious scholarly attention. However, this needs to be accompanied by a focus on the wider intercultural and transcultural communicative practices in which language is embedded and enmeshed. This entails recognition of the central place of intercultural competence and the awareness that is necessary to manage such complexity, variation, and fluidity in communication. As such, this chapter addresses Hall and Wicaksono’s (this volume) call to interrogate and be “explicit about what we, as applied linguists, think English is—our ontologies of English—and how these ontologies underpin our educational ideologies and professional practices”, with a particular focus on the intercultural and transcultural dimensions to both English use and education policy and practice.

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More information

Published date: 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437509
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437509
PURE UUID: 7fb56cc2-7093-41e0-84f0-ec8d69daae69

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Feb 2020 17:30
Last modified: 03 Feb 2020 17:30

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Contributors

Author: William Baker
Editor: Hall Christopher
Editor: Rachel Wicaksono

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