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Excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being: the mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction

Excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being: the mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction
Excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being: the mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction
Objectives
To examine the relationship between excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being in preschool children, and the potential mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction.

Study design
A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shanghai, China using stratified random sampling design. A representative sample of 20 324 children aged 3-4 years old from 191 kindergartens participated in this study. Parents completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and reported the child's time spent on screen exposure, sleep duration, height, weight, and parent-child interactive activities.

Results
Preschool children in Shanghai were exposed to 2.8 (95% CI 2.7, 2.9) hours/day of screen time, with 78.6% (95% CI 77.8,79.3) exceeding 1 hour/day and 53% (95% CI 52.0,53.9) exceeding 2 hours/day. Every additional hour of screen time was associated with increased risk for poor psychosocial well-being. Body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction mediated the effect of excessive screen time on children's psychosocial well-being, among which parent-child interaction contributed most. Parent-child interaction could explain 28.1% of the effect on total difficulties and 58.6% on prosocial behavior.

Conclusions
Excessive screen time during early childhood exists in Shanghai preschool children. Excessive screen exposure was associated with poor psychosocial well-being in preschool children via a number of mediators, mostly by reducing parent-child interaction.
0022-3476
157-162.e1
Zhao, Jin
ec715728-8c6b-42b7-9532-bb5b999008e6
Zhang, Yunting
2849b102-248b-40df-ba6c-a249bdf04c1e
Jiang, Fan
69160143-fdcd-4ab9-8cc4-b858be7e2325
Ip, Patrick
aa674a40-8118-486d-99a1-cd45958d4a73
Ho, Frederick Ka Wing
ee5ffed1-0663-4c57-b4ee-79b753267ff0
Zhang, Yuning
d04a3a32-daa7-4441-8bdf-9bbaeb44583f
Huang, Hong
57fbe344-a3d5-489e-a558-e0c342ff3610
Zhao, Jin
ec715728-8c6b-42b7-9532-bb5b999008e6
Zhang, Yunting
2849b102-248b-40df-ba6c-a249bdf04c1e
Jiang, Fan
69160143-fdcd-4ab9-8cc4-b858be7e2325
Ip, Patrick
aa674a40-8118-486d-99a1-cd45958d4a73
Ho, Frederick Ka Wing
ee5ffed1-0663-4c57-b4ee-79b753267ff0
Zhang, Yuning
d04a3a32-daa7-4441-8bdf-9bbaeb44583f
Huang, Hong
57fbe344-a3d5-489e-a558-e0c342ff3610

Zhao, Jin, Zhang, Yunting, Jiang, Fan, Ip, Patrick, Ho, Frederick Ka Wing, Zhang, Yuning and Huang, Hong (2018) Excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being: the mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction. Journal of Pediatrics, 202, 157-162.e1. (doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.06.029).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives
To examine the relationship between excessive screen time and psychosocial well-being in preschool children, and the potential mediating role of body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction.

Study design
A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shanghai, China using stratified random sampling design. A representative sample of 20 324 children aged 3-4 years old from 191 kindergartens participated in this study. Parents completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and reported the child's time spent on screen exposure, sleep duration, height, weight, and parent-child interactive activities.

Results
Preschool children in Shanghai were exposed to 2.8 (95% CI 2.7, 2.9) hours/day of screen time, with 78.6% (95% CI 77.8,79.3) exceeding 1 hour/day and 53% (95% CI 52.0,53.9) exceeding 2 hours/day. Every additional hour of screen time was associated with increased risk for poor psychosocial well-being. Body mass index, sleep duration, and parent-child interaction mediated the effect of excessive screen time on children's psychosocial well-being, among which parent-child interaction contributed most. Parent-child interaction could explain 28.1% of the effect on total difficulties and 58.6% on prosocial behavior.

Conclusions
Excessive screen time during early childhood exists in Shanghai preschool children. Excessive screen exposure was associated with poor psychosocial well-being in preschool children via a number of mediators, mostly by reducing parent-child interaction.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 August 2018
Published date: November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437514
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437514
ISSN: 0022-3476
PURE UUID: 926991fb-e40c-420b-8789-515db2028ed5
ORCID for Yuning Zhang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2225-6368

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Feb 2020 17:31
Last modified: 23 Jul 2020 00:48

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Contributors

Author: Jin Zhao
Author: Yunting Zhang
Author: Fan Jiang
Author: Patrick Ip
Author: Frederick Ka Wing Ho
Author: Yuning Zhang ORCID iD
Author: Hong Huang

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