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A Comparison of hydrogen and ammonia for future long distance shipping fuels

A Comparison of hydrogen and ammonia for future long distance shipping fuels
A Comparison of hydrogen and ammonia for future long distance shipping fuels
Decarbonisation of the shipping industry is necessary. Two potential low-emission fuels for long distance international shipping are hydrogen (H2) and ammonia (NH3). Using data from an LNG tanker, approximations were made for energy requirements based on delivered power, with the maximum consumption for a single voyage being 9270 MWh. Calculations were made for the required volume, mass and variable cost for several fuel types. Results showed that H2 required volume was 6550 m3 and 11040 m3 for liquid and pressurised gas storage respectively. H2 is frequently dismissed for mobile applications due to low volumetric density, however these volumes are not unrealistic. Ammonia has several desirable characteristics, but also has low gravitational energy density increasing the overall ship mass by 0.3% to 3.7%, negatively affecting performance. Batteries are too large, heavy and expensive for long distance applications. Both hydrogen and ammonia have potential, but require further research before becoming viable.
McKinlay, Charles John
70c883f4-2e6c-4790-a120-ee6caf41cb57
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Hudson, Dominic
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7
McKinlay, Charles John
70c883f4-2e6c-4790-a120-ee6caf41cb57
Turnock, Stephen
d6442f5c-d9af-4fdb-8406-7c79a92b26ce
Hudson, Dominic
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7

McKinlay, Charles John, Turnock, Stephen and Hudson, Dominic (2020) A Comparison of hydrogen and ammonia for future long distance shipping fuels. LNG/LPG and Alternative Fuel Ships, Royal Institute of Naval Architects, HQ, 8-9 Northumberland Street, London WC2N 5DA, United Kingdom. 29 - 30 Jan 2020. 13 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Decarbonisation of the shipping industry is necessary. Two potential low-emission fuels for long distance international shipping are hydrogen (H2) and ammonia (NH3). Using data from an LNG tanker, approximations were made for energy requirements based on delivered power, with the maximum consumption for a single voyage being 9270 MWh. Calculations were made for the required volume, mass and variable cost for several fuel types. Results showed that H2 required volume was 6550 m3 and 11040 m3 for liquid and pressurised gas storage respectively. H2 is frequently dismissed for mobile applications due to low volumetric density, however these volumes are not unrealistic. Ammonia has several desirable characteristics, but also has low gravitational energy density increasing the overall ship mass by 0.3% to 3.7%, negatively affecting performance. Batteries are too large, heavy and expensive for long distance applications. Both hydrogen and ammonia have potential, but require further research before becoming viable.

Text
C.McKinlay A Comparison of Hydrogen and Ammonia for Future Long Distance Shipping Fuels - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 29 January 2020
Venue - Dates: LNG/LPG and Alternative Fuel Ships, Royal Institute of Naval Architects, HQ, 8-9 Northumberland Street, London WC2N 5DA, United Kingdom, 2020-01-29 - 2020-01-30

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437555
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437555
PURE UUID: 6947727c-10d7-4175-8eb9-999dcef349ec
ORCID for Stephen Turnock: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6288-0400
ORCID for Dominic Hudson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2012-6255

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Date deposited: 05 Feb 2020 17:31
Last modified: 06 Feb 2020 01:25

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