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Physical activity among hospitalised older people: The feasibility and acceptability of a volunteer-led mobility intervention

Physical activity among hospitalised older people: The feasibility and acceptability of a volunteer-led mobility intervention
Physical activity among hospitalised older people: The feasibility and acceptability of a volunteer-led mobility intervention
Physical inactivity among older inpatients is associated with worsening physical function
and increasing dependence in activities of daily living. Studies have shown that
interventions using paid staff to improve physical activity levels may reduce the risk of
some of these harmful effects. However, few studies have explored the use of volunteers
in this role. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using
trained volunteers to encourage older inpatients to be physically active.

Physical activity levels of inpatients aged ≥ 70 years on three study wards receiving usual
care were measured using two accelerometers. An evidence-based training programme
for volunteers was developed with therapy colleagues. The volunteer-led activity sessions
were implemented on the study wards with repeat measurement of physical activity.
Finally, the acceptability of the intervention was assessed through interviews and focus
groups among patients, volunteers, nurses and therapists.

42 participants (mean age 87.5 years, SD 4.6) receiving usual care had their physical
activity measured. The median daily step count was 636 steps (IQR 298 – 1468), and the
mean daily acceleration was 9.1milligravity (mg) (SD 3.3). 17 volunteers were recruited
and volunteer retention at the end of the study period was 70% (12 volunteers). 310
activity sessions were offered to 50 participants and 230 sessions (74%) were completed.
No adverse event was reported. 25 participants including patients, volunteers, nurses and
therapists were interviewed. Findings from the interviews demonstrated that the
intervention was well-received among patients, nurses and therapists.

Volunteers can be trained and retained to safely encourage older inpatients to be more
active. Further research is required on the impact of the volunteer-led intervention on
patient outcomes.
University of Southampton
Lim, Stephen
0cb3592c-aa12-48a6-9b27-6a65311ecad4
Lim, Stephen
0cb3592c-aa12-48a6-9b27-6a65311ecad4
Roberts, Helen
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb

Lim, Stephen (2018) Physical activity among hospitalised older people: The feasibility and acceptability of a volunteer-led mobility intervention. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 420pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Physical inactivity among older inpatients is associated with worsening physical function
and increasing dependence in activities of daily living. Studies have shown that
interventions using paid staff to improve physical activity levels may reduce the risk of
some of these harmful effects. However, few studies have explored the use of volunteers
in this role. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of using
trained volunteers to encourage older inpatients to be physically active.

Physical activity levels of inpatients aged ≥ 70 years on three study wards receiving usual
care were measured using two accelerometers. An evidence-based training programme
for volunteers was developed with therapy colleagues. The volunteer-led activity sessions
were implemented on the study wards with repeat measurement of physical activity.
Finally, the acceptability of the intervention was assessed through interviews and focus
groups among patients, volunteers, nurses and therapists.

42 participants (mean age 87.5 years, SD 4.6) receiving usual care had their physical
activity measured. The median daily step count was 636 steps (IQR 298 – 1468), and the
mean daily acceleration was 9.1milligravity (mg) (SD 3.3). 17 volunteers were recruited
and volunteer retention at the end of the study period was 70% (12 volunteers). 310
activity sessions were offered to 50 participants and 230 sessions (74%) were completed.
No adverse event was reported. 25 participants including patients, volunteers, nurses and
therapists were interviewed. Findings from the interviews demonstrated that the
intervention was well-received among patients, nurses and therapists.

Volunteers can be trained and retained to safely encourage older inpatients to be more
active. Further research is required on the impact of the volunteer-led intervention on
patient outcomes.

Text
Thesis whole document 05122018 FINAL Electronic copy no signature - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437620
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437620
PURE UUID: d70c7bec-c8da-4c17-8d7d-0189b517c735
ORCID for Helen Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Feb 2020 17:34
Last modified: 07 Feb 2020 01:28

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