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Charting the development of the Egyptian accounting profession (1946-2016): An analysis of the State-Profession dynamics

Charting the development of the Egyptian accounting profession (1946-2016): An analysis of the State-Profession dynamics
Charting the development of the Egyptian accounting profession (1946-2016): An analysis of the State-Profession dynamics
This paper mobilises notions of professional closure and political economy to analyse the development of the Egyptian accounting profession (1946–2016). We rely on interviews with Egyptian Society of Accountants and Auditors (ESAA) board members, government officials, representatives of international/local firms, and academics. Legislative documents (particularly Accounting Practice Law 133/1951), regulations and publications were also analysed. Established since 1946, ESAA’s initial attempts to embed an ‘Anglo-American’ professional model were curtailed by the newly independent State enabling non-credentialed and relatively less experienced native practitioners to be registered as qualified accountants. The State’s influence persisted during the socialist period of nationalisation with a de-emphasising of the accounting profession as an
occupational group. The early stages of market capitalism witnessed attempts to redevelop a private-sector-led profession with the support of international organisations, which re-asserted the dominant position of ESAA members. However, government, ESAA and international agencies’ efforts to repeal the original Accounting Practice Law and achieve market closure for the primary benefit of ESAA members were thwarted by political pressure from non-ESAA accountants. Nonetheless, ESAA eventually secured privileged access to the listed firms’ audit market. This paper aims to enhance our understanding of changing State-led priorities on accounting professionalization in African developing countries.
Egypt; professionalization; accounting; developing countries, Accounting, Egypt, Developing countries, Professionalization
1045-2354
1-18
Ghattas, Peter
d24ab1ef-b046-4823-ab50-5a381e9ea53d
Soobaroyen, Teerooven
6686e2f8-564f-4f7f-b079-9dc8a2f53a48
Marnet, Oliver
6840910e-2e26-4e63-aa84-76c5c8d27877
Ghattas, Peter
d24ab1ef-b046-4823-ab50-5a381e9ea53d
Soobaroyen, Teerooven
6686e2f8-564f-4f7f-b079-9dc8a2f53a48
Marnet, Oliver
6840910e-2e26-4e63-aa84-76c5c8d27877

Ghattas, Peter, Soobaroyen, Teerooven and Marnet, Oliver (2020) Charting the development of the Egyptian accounting profession (1946-2016): An analysis of the State-Profession dynamics. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 0, 1-18, [102159]. (doi:10.1016/j.cpa.2020.102159).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper mobilises notions of professional closure and political economy to analyse the development of the Egyptian accounting profession (1946–2016). We rely on interviews with Egyptian Society of Accountants and Auditors (ESAA) board members, government officials, representatives of international/local firms, and academics. Legislative documents (particularly Accounting Practice Law 133/1951), regulations and publications were also analysed. Established since 1946, ESAA’s initial attempts to embed an ‘Anglo-American’ professional model were curtailed by the newly independent State enabling non-credentialed and relatively less experienced native practitioners to be registered as qualified accountants. The State’s influence persisted during the socialist period of nationalisation with a de-emphasising of the accounting profession as an
occupational group. The early stages of market capitalism witnessed attempts to redevelop a private-sector-led profession with the support of international organisations, which re-asserted the dominant position of ESAA members. However, government, ESAA and international agencies’ efforts to repeal the original Accounting Practice Law and achieve market closure for the primary benefit of ESAA members were thwarted by political pressure from non-ESAA accountants. Nonetheless, ESAA eventually secured privileged access to the listed firms’ audit market. This paper aims to enhance our understanding of changing State-led priorities on accounting professionalization in African developing countries.

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CPA 2020 Egypt - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 28 January 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 February 2020
Published date: 20 February 2020
Keywords: Egypt; professionalization; accounting; developing countries, Accounting, Egypt, Developing countries, Professionalization

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437839
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437839
ISSN: 1045-2354
PURE UUID: f4c5f05d-9bf0-435e-95f5-d158dc876480
ORCID for Teerooven Soobaroyen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3340-1666
ORCID for Oliver Marnet: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9450-2332

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Feb 2020 17:32
Last modified: 20 Sep 2021 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Peter Ghattas
Author: Teerooven Soobaroyen ORCID iD
Author: Oliver Marnet ORCID iD

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