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Impact of the electrical configuration on the thermal poling of optical fibres with embedded electrodes: Theory and experiments

Impact of the electrical configuration on the thermal poling of optical fibres with embedded electrodes: Theory and experiments
Impact of the electrical configuration on the thermal poling of optical fibres with embedded electrodes: Theory and experiments
Thermal poling of optical fibres is a well-known technique to create second order nonlinearity inside silica optical fibres, otherwise characterized by negligible nonlinear properties in the electric dipole approximation. Some recent work, realized by F. De Lucia et al., has introduced a new technique, designated as 'Induction poling' [1] and with the adoption of liquid materials as embedded electrodes (both metallic and non-metallic) [2], allows thermal poling of optical fibres with any length and geometry. Despite these advances, thermal poling still represents a technological challenge that needs to be continuously optimized and simplified. In this work we focus our attention on the optimization of the electrical configuration of thermal poling of single mode optical fibres. We consider the single-anode (S-A) configuration, where a single electrode is embedded inside one of the two cladding channels of the optical fibre and connected to the desired electrical potential, and the double-anode (D-A) configuration, introduced for the first time by W. Margulis et al. in 2009 [3] and later commonly adopted by the scientific community. Fig. 1(a) shows the dependence (numerically calculated with COMSOL Multiphysics) of the χ(2)eff on the poling duration for both electrode configurations and at two different positions. The key result of these simulations is that the final value (for extended poling times) of the χ(2)eff in S-A configuration is approximately double with respect to the one obtained in the D-A approach. Furthermore, the value at the centre of the fibre is almost zero in D-A configuration. We hypothesize that this behaviour arises from the mutually competitive evolution of the space-charge formation due to the presence of two anodes. In contrast, the S-A configuration does not suffer from this limitation. Experimentally for the first time the χ(2)eff was measured in a process of second harmonic generation (SHG) at 1550 nm in a fibre periodically poled in S-A configuration. The nonlinearity has been periodically erased via exposure to a UV light generated by a frequency doubled Argon-ion laser (CW, 244 nm). Fig. 1(c) shows the spectrum of the SHG light.
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
De Lucia, Francesco
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Bannerman, Rex
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Gates, James
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Núñez-Velázquez, Martin Miguel Angel
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Sahu, Jayanta
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Englebert, Nicolas
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Leo, Francois
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Gorza, Simon Pierre
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Sazio, Pier
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De Lucia, Francesco
cf9ad28f-b654-4375-90f6-2b60ee0088f3
Bannerman, Rex
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Gates, James
b71e31a1-8caa-477e-8556-b64f6cae0dc2
Núñez-Velázquez, Martin Miguel Angel
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Sahu, Jayanta
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Englebert, Nicolas
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Leo, Francois
2b3c8344-1925-4bef-89a1-c55927614f2e
Gorza, Simon Pierre
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Sazio, Pier
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De Lucia, Francesco, Bannerman, Rex, Gates, James, Núñez-Velázquez, Martin Miguel Angel, Sahu, Jayanta, Englebert, Nicolas, Leo, Francois, Gorza, Simon Pierre and Sazio, Pier (2019) Impact of the electrical configuration on the thermal poling of optical fibres with embedded electrodes: Theory and experiments. In 2019 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO/Europe-EQEC 2019. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 1 pp . (doi:10.1109/CLEOE-EQEC.2019.8872800).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Thermal poling of optical fibres is a well-known technique to create second order nonlinearity inside silica optical fibres, otherwise characterized by negligible nonlinear properties in the electric dipole approximation. Some recent work, realized by F. De Lucia et al., has introduced a new technique, designated as 'Induction poling' [1] and with the adoption of liquid materials as embedded electrodes (both metallic and non-metallic) [2], allows thermal poling of optical fibres with any length and geometry. Despite these advances, thermal poling still represents a technological challenge that needs to be continuously optimized and simplified. In this work we focus our attention on the optimization of the electrical configuration of thermal poling of single mode optical fibres. We consider the single-anode (S-A) configuration, where a single electrode is embedded inside one of the two cladding channels of the optical fibre and connected to the desired electrical potential, and the double-anode (D-A) configuration, introduced for the first time by W. Margulis et al. in 2009 [3] and later commonly adopted by the scientific community. Fig. 1(a) shows the dependence (numerically calculated with COMSOL Multiphysics) of the χ(2)eff on the poling duration for both electrode configurations and at two different positions. The key result of these simulations is that the final value (for extended poling times) of the χ(2)eff in S-A configuration is approximately double with respect to the one obtained in the D-A approach. Furthermore, the value at the centre of the fibre is almost zero in D-A configuration. We hypothesize that this behaviour arises from the mutually competitive evolution of the space-charge formation due to the presence of two anodes. In contrast, the S-A configuration does not suffer from this limitation. Experimentally for the first time the χ(2)eff was measured in a process of second harmonic generation (SHG) at 1550 nm in a fibre periodically poled in S-A configuration. The nonlinearity has been periodically erased via exposure to a UV light generated by a frequency doubled Argon-ion laser (CW, 244 nm). Fig. 1(c) shows the spectrum of the SHG light.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 1 June 2019
Published date: 17 October 2019
Venue - Dates: 2019 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics Europe and European Quantum Electronics Conference, CLEO/Europe-EQEC 2019, ICM – International Congress Centre, Munich, Germany, 2019-06-22 - 2019-06-26

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Local EPrints ID: 437879
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437879
PURE UUID: 63da604d-e646-4741-898d-1811297353f8
ORCID for James Gates: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8671-5987
ORCID for Martin Miguel Angel Núñez-Velázquez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0774-3272
ORCID for Jayanta Sahu: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3560-6152
ORCID for Pier Sazio: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6506-9266

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Date deposited: 21 Feb 2020 17:31
Last modified: 20 Feb 2021 02:51

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Contributors

Author: Francesco De Lucia
Author: Rex Bannerman
Author: James Gates ORCID iD
Author: Jayanta Sahu ORCID iD
Author: Nicolas Englebert
Author: Francois Leo
Author: Simon Pierre Gorza
Author: Pier Sazio ORCID iD

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