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Simplicity in the design, operation, and applications of mechanically interlocked molecular machines

Simplicity in the design, operation, and applications of mechanically interlocked molecular machines
Simplicity in the design, operation, and applications of mechanically interlocked molecular machines
Mechanically interlocked molecules are perhaps best known as components of molecular machines, a view further reinforced by the Nobel Prize in 2016 to Stoddart and Sauvage. Despite amazing progress since these pioneers of the field reported the first examples of molecular shuttles, genuine applications of interlocked molecular machines remain elusive, and many barriers remain to be overcome before such molecular devices make the transition from impressive prototypes on the laboratory bench to useful products. Here, we discuss simplicity as a design principle that could be applied in the development of the next generation of molecular machines with a view to moving toward real-world applications of these intriguing systems in the longer term.
2374-7943
Heard, Andrew W.
f01893de-d170-48db-8804-b0a83bc4f192
Goldup, Stephen M.
0a93eedd-98bb-42c1-a963-e2815665e937
Heard, Andrew W.
f01893de-d170-48db-8804-b0a83bc4f192
Goldup, Stephen M.
0a93eedd-98bb-42c1-a963-e2815665e937

Heard, Andrew W. and Goldup, Stephen M. (2020) Simplicity in the design, operation, and applications of mechanically interlocked molecular machines. ACS Central Science. (doi:10.1021/acscentsci.9b01185).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Mechanically interlocked molecules are perhaps best known as components of molecular machines, a view further reinforced by the Nobel Prize in 2016 to Stoddart and Sauvage. Despite amazing progress since these pioneers of the field reported the first examples of molecular shuttles, genuine applications of interlocked molecular machines remain elusive, and many barriers remain to be overcome before such molecular devices make the transition from impressive prototypes on the laboratory bench to useful products. Here, we discuss simplicity as a design principle that could be applied in the development of the next generation of molecular machines with a view to moving toward real-world applications of these intriguing systems in the longer term.

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2020 01 05 MS Central Science Outlook Heard - Accepted Manuscript
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e-pub ahead of print date: 22 January 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 437968
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/437968
ISSN: 2374-7943
PURE UUID: 1b28882b-df6e-4c71-9cc2-1617ae621e67
ORCID for Stephen M. Goldup: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3781-0464

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Date deposited: 24 Feb 2020 17:32
Last modified: 25 Feb 2020 01:34

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