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Creating a qualitative typology of electric vehicle driving: EV journey-making mapped in a chronological framework

Creating a qualitative typology of electric vehicle driving: EV journey-making mapped in a chronological framework
Creating a qualitative typology of electric vehicle driving: EV journey-making mapped in a chronological framework
‘Range anxiety’ is considered a barrier to market acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs), but perceptions of inadequate recharging infrastructure and limited battery range may be part of a more complex set of consumer concerns; experiences and practices of existing EV drivers – with reference to wider transport and energy systems – need to be understood in greater detail. Qualitative material from semi-structured interviews [n = 88] is used to formulate a chronological Typology of Electric Vehicle Driving which synthesises drivers’ decisions, actions and dynamic considerations before, during and after a journey. The typology outlines and tabulates spatio-temporal elements specific to driving an EV; describes adaptations and compromises in household routines and travel habits; draws out how or when drivers engage with external digital information sources – i.e. smartphone apps, social media – during journey-making; plots their intervention in behavioural changes; and could inform development of infrastructure, tools or services, policy or interventions to support EV uptake.
Behaviour change, Digital media, Practices, Social media, Task analysis, Taxonomy
1369-8478
159-186
Alkhalisi, Andrea, Farah
f8dc3696-0963-41da-ae01-c08d066f7f45
Alkhalisi, Andrea, Farah
f8dc3696-0963-41da-ae01-c08d066f7f45

Alkhalisi, Andrea, Farah (2020) Creating a qualitative typology of electric vehicle driving: EV journey-making mapped in a chronological framework. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 69, 159-186. (doi:10.1016/j.trf.2020.01.009).

Record type: Article

Abstract

‘Range anxiety’ is considered a barrier to market acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs), but perceptions of inadequate recharging infrastructure and limited battery range may be part of a more complex set of consumer concerns; experiences and practices of existing EV drivers – with reference to wider transport and energy systems – need to be understood in greater detail. Qualitative material from semi-structured interviews [n = 88] is used to formulate a chronological Typology of Electric Vehicle Driving which synthesises drivers’ decisions, actions and dynamic considerations before, during and after a journey. The typology outlines and tabulates spatio-temporal elements specific to driving an EV; describes adaptations and compromises in household routines and travel habits; draws out how or when drivers engage with external digital information sources – i.e. smartphone apps, social media – during journey-making; plots their intervention in behavioural changes; and could inform development of infrastructure, tools or services, policy or interventions to support EV uptake.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 January 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 January 2020
Published date: February 2020
Keywords: Behaviour change, Digital media, Practices, Social media, Task analysis, Taxonomy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438204
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438204
ISSN: 1369-8478
PURE UUID: 5c3361da-4eb2-4d63-bbf6-b5568c1f4bd7

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Date deposited: 04 Mar 2020 17:30
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 05:13

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Contributors

Author: Andrea, Farah Alkhalisi

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