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Shale gas reservoirs: a comparative approach

Shale gas reservoirs: a comparative approach
Shale gas reservoirs: a comparative approach
Until recently, shales were regarded by the oil industry as a setback hindering the operations while drilling to target sandstone and limestone reservoirs. Also, it was considered as the source rock for hydrocarbons migrating into conventional reservoirs and as the seal for trapping oil and gas in underlying sediments. Thanks to the “shale gas revolution” in the USA, however, it is known today that shales, as the most abundant form of sedimentary rock on Earth, can form low-permeable reservoirs containing huge quantities of hydrocarbons. Unlike the conventional reservoirs, production from shale gas resources would not be economically feasible due to the very low rates of flow of natural gas from the formation of ultra-low permeability. Yet, this is only one of the characteristics of shale gas reservoir which makes them different from conventional resources. Outlining the fundamental differences between shale gas plays and conventional gas reservoirs along with a brief description of status of shale gas development is the subject of this chapter. Furthermore, the potential of shale gas in the UK and the problems associated with its development compared to the US shale gas are presented.
2509-3126
1-11
Springer
Gholinezhad, Jebraeel
79d96efe-2057-4b95-8be1-4d83162c937a
Fianu, John Senam
18396909-6a3d-4b3c-807d-9388d15bbb54
Hassan, Mohamed Galal
ce323212-f178-4d72-85cf-23cd30605cd8
Gholinezhad, Jebraeel
79d96efe-2057-4b95-8be1-4d83162c937a
Fianu, John Senam
18396909-6a3d-4b3c-807d-9388d15bbb54
Hassan, Mohamed Galal
ce323212-f178-4d72-85cf-23cd30605cd8

Gholinezhad, Jebraeel, Fianu, John Senam and Hassan, Mohamed Galal (2018) Shale gas reservoirs: a comparative approach. In, Challenges in Modelling and Simulation of Shale Gas Reservoirs. (SpringerBriefs in Petroleum Geoscience & Engineering, , (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-70769-3_1)) Springer, pp. 1-11. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-70769-3_1).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Until recently, shales were regarded by the oil industry as a setback hindering the operations while drilling to target sandstone and limestone reservoirs. Also, it was considered as the source rock for hydrocarbons migrating into conventional reservoirs and as the seal for trapping oil and gas in underlying sediments. Thanks to the “shale gas revolution” in the USA, however, it is known today that shales, as the most abundant form of sedimentary rock on Earth, can form low-permeable reservoirs containing huge quantities of hydrocarbons. Unlike the conventional reservoirs, production from shale gas resources would not be economically feasible due to the very low rates of flow of natural gas from the formation of ultra-low permeability. Yet, this is only one of the characteristics of shale gas reservoir which makes them different from conventional resources. Outlining the fundamental differences between shale gas plays and conventional gas reservoirs along with a brief description of status of shale gas development is the subject of this chapter. Furthermore, the potential of shale gas in the UK and the problems associated with its development compared to the US shale gas are presented.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 28 December 2017
Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438251
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438251
ISSN: 2509-3126
PURE UUID: ace7edac-ef76-4c0f-94f3-fd3396889585
ORCID for Mohamed Galal Hassan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3729-4543

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Date deposited: 04 Mar 2020 17:31
Last modified: 29 Jul 2020 01:54

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Author: Jebraeel Gholinezhad
Author: John Senam Fianu
Author: Mohamed Galal Hassan ORCID iD

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