The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Numerical study of shale gas flow behaviour in reservoir and hydraulic fractures

Numerical study of shale gas flow behaviour in reservoir and hydraulic fractures
Numerical study of shale gas flow behaviour in reservoir and hydraulic fractures
Some of the inappropriate assumptions that are often made in the use of commercial simulators for shale gas simulations are discussed in this chapter. For shale gas reservoirs characterised by very small pore size network, these approximations could lead to serious errors. Modelling of the geological complexities of shale gas requires the use of appropriate grid structures within the simulator to handle these complexities. Also, implementation of appropriate numerical methods that can adequately solve the set of mathematical equations associated with the simulation of shale gas reservoirs is the key to obtain sensible simulation results. This chapter provides a review of these inherent challenges in shale gas modelling. The concept of instantaneous capillary equilibrium within the pore networks as well as the non-Darcy flow that occurs within the matrix of the pore network is critically reviewed while the existing theories for proppant transport within the fractures are examined.
2509-3126
43-59
Springer
Gholinezhad, Jebraeel
79d96efe-2057-4b95-8be1-4d83162c937a
Fianu, John Senam
18396909-6a3d-4b3c-807d-9388d15bbb54
Hassan, Mohamed Galal
ce323212-f178-4d72-85cf-23cd30605cd8
Gholinezhad, Jebraeel
79d96efe-2057-4b95-8be1-4d83162c937a
Fianu, John Senam
18396909-6a3d-4b3c-807d-9388d15bbb54
Hassan, Mohamed Galal
ce323212-f178-4d72-85cf-23cd30605cd8

Gholinezhad, Jebraeel, Fianu, John Senam and Hassan, Mohamed Galal (2018) Numerical study of shale gas flow behaviour in reservoir and hydraulic fractures. In, Challenges in Modelling and Simulation of Shale Gas Reservoirs. (SpringerBriefs in Petroleum Geoscience & Engineering, , (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-70769-3_3)) UK. Springer, pp. 43-59. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-70769-3_3).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Some of the inappropriate assumptions that are often made in the use of commercial simulators for shale gas simulations are discussed in this chapter. For shale gas reservoirs characterised by very small pore size network, these approximations could lead to serious errors. Modelling of the geological complexities of shale gas requires the use of appropriate grid structures within the simulator to handle these complexities. Also, implementation of appropriate numerical methods that can adequately solve the set of mathematical equations associated with the simulation of shale gas reservoirs is the key to obtain sensible simulation results. This chapter provides a review of these inherent challenges in shale gas modelling. The concept of instantaneous capillary equilibrium within the pore networks as well as the non-Darcy flow that occurs within the matrix of the pore network is critically reviewed while the existing theories for proppant transport within the fractures are examined.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 28 December 2017
Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438257
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438257
ISSN: 2509-3126
PURE UUID: 54adb557-4dfa-484e-9ad5-a1128e6b38f8
ORCID for Mohamed Galal Hassan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3729-4543

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Mar 2020 17:32
Last modified: 01 Aug 2020 01:53

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Jebraeel Gholinezhad
Author: John Senam Fianu
Author: Mohamed Galal Hassan ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×