The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Biofilm mechanics: implications in infection and survival

Biofilm mechanics: implications in infection and survival
Biofilm mechanics: implications in infection and survival
It has long been recognized that biofilms are viscoelastic materials, however the importance of this attribute to the survival and persistence of these microbial communities is yet to be fully realized. Here we review work, which focuses on understanding biofilm mechanics and put this knowledge in the context of biofilm survival, particularly for biofilm-associated infections. We note that biofilm viscoelasticity may be an evolved property of these communities, and that the production of multiple extracellular polymeric slime components may be a way to ensure the development of biofilms with complex viscoelastic properties. We discuss viscoelasticity facilitating biofilm survival in the context of promoting the formation of larger and stronger biofilms when exposed to shear forces, promoting fluid-like behavior of the biofilm and subsequent biofilm expansion by viscous flow, and enabling resistance to both mechanical and chemical methods of clearance. We conclude that biofilm viscoelasticity contributes to the virulence of chronic biofilm infections.
biofilm, mechanics, viscoelasticity, Biophysics, extracellular matrix, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), tolerance, Persistence
2590-2075
Gloag, Erin S.
36de1738-c25d-4eb7-acd3-1ad55d9a7cee
Fabbri, Stefania
c93b6166-2117-48a9-9a88-b23a62c7b5da
Wozniak, Daniel J.
bfa8e8e5-5929-449b-af6a-ec2d86c47eb5
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f
Gloag, Erin S.
36de1738-c25d-4eb7-acd3-1ad55d9a7cee
Fabbri, Stefania
c93b6166-2117-48a9-9a88-b23a62c7b5da
Wozniak, Daniel J.
bfa8e8e5-5929-449b-af6a-ec2d86c47eb5
Stoodley, Paul
08614665-92a9-4466-806e-20c6daeb483f

Gloag, Erin S., Fabbri, Stefania, Wozniak, Daniel J. and Stoodley, Paul (2020) Biofilm mechanics: implications in infection and survival. Biofilm, 2, [100017]. (doi:10.1016/j.bioflm.2019.100017).

Record type: Review

Abstract

It has long been recognized that biofilms are viscoelastic materials, however the importance of this attribute to the survival and persistence of these microbial communities is yet to be fully realized. Here we review work, which focuses on understanding biofilm mechanics and put this knowledge in the context of biofilm survival, particularly for biofilm-associated infections. We note that biofilm viscoelasticity may be an evolved property of these communities, and that the production of multiple extracellular polymeric slime components may be a way to ensure the development of biofilms with complex viscoelastic properties. We discuss viscoelasticity facilitating biofilm survival in the context of promoting the formation of larger and stronger biofilms when exposed to shear forces, promoting fluid-like behavior of the biofilm and subsequent biofilm expansion by viscous flow, and enabling resistance to both mechanical and chemical methods of clearance. We conclude that biofilm viscoelasticity contributes to the virulence of chronic biofilm infections.

Text
PS230 Gloag_Mechanics Review_final - Accepted Manuscript
Download (733kB)
Text
1-s2.0-S2590207519300176-main-1 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 December 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 December 2019
Published date: December 2020
Keywords: biofilm, mechanics, viscoelasticity, Biophysics, extracellular matrix, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), tolerance, Persistence

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438364
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438364
ISSN: 2590-2075
PURE UUID: 231b11e6-ad12-4b98-9fd8-b588c076ccf6
ORCID for Paul Stoodley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6069-273X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Mar 2020 17:33
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 05:12

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Erin S. Gloag
Author: Stefania Fabbri
Author: Daniel J. Wozniak
Author: Paul Stoodley ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×