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Towards the tumble resistant microlight

Towards the tumble resistant microlight
Towards the tumble resistant microlight
The tumble mode is a pitching departure from controlled flight which leads to a pitch autorotation that is generally unrecoverable – resulting in vertical ground impact, usually preceded by in-flight breakup (the mechanism for which, surprisingly, can sometimes prevent loss of life). This was identified in work led by the British Microlight Aircraft Association beginning in 1997 as a response to a number of fatal accidents in Rogallo winged microlight aeroplanes, although the tumble is also known to occur to hang-gliders. This paper explains how this class of aeroplane is controlled, and how it has been found that they can enter the tumble mode. The mechanism by which the tumble can be entered is described. This has led to work showing how flight testing can be used to establish and demonstrate resistance to tumble entry – particularly important with increasing number of very high performance flexwings. These flight tests will be explained, together with the significance of the results. Recent accident investigation work has also shown a new mechanism of tumble entry, through partial failure of the A-frame structure and the pitch-trimmer mechanism. Also described is a possible relevance to well known historical accidents to flying wing aeroplanes – specifically the YB-49 and dH-108, and discovered data on the characteristics of the BKB-1 flying wing glider; are also described.
microlight, tumble
Gratton, Guy
7b7d9489-9aff-40e1-93b0-b135bd13df6e
Newman, Simon
802c97ed-ea28-477f-8b1e-8e4f873c4281
Gratton, Guy
7b7d9489-9aff-40e1-93b0-b135bd13df6e
Newman, Simon
802c97ed-ea28-477f-8b1e-8e4f873c4281

Gratton, Guy and Newman, Simon (1970) Towards the tumble resistant microlight. European Symposium of Society of Experimental Test Pilots. 21 - 25 Jun 2006. 19 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The tumble mode is a pitching departure from controlled flight which leads to a pitch autorotation that is generally unrecoverable – resulting in vertical ground impact, usually preceded by in-flight breakup (the mechanism for which, surprisingly, can sometimes prevent loss of life). This was identified in work led by the British Microlight Aircraft Association beginning in 1997 as a response to a number of fatal accidents in Rogallo winged microlight aeroplanes, although the tumble is also known to occur to hang-gliders. This paper explains how this class of aeroplane is controlled, and how it has been found that they can enter the tumble mode. The mechanism by which the tumble can be entered is described. This has led to work showing how flight testing can be used to establish and demonstrate resistance to tumble entry – particularly important with increasing number of very high performance flexwings. These flight tests will be explained, together with the significance of the results. Recent accident investigation work has also shown a new mechanism of tumble entry, through partial failure of the A-frame structure and the pitch-trimmer mechanism. Also described is a possible relevance to well known historical accidents to flying wing aeroplanes – specifically the YB-49 and dH-108, and discovered data on the characteristics of the BKB-1 flying wing glider; are also described.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 1970
Venue - Dates: European Symposium of Society of Experimental Test Pilots, 2006-06-21 - 2006-06-25
Keywords: microlight, tumble
Organisations: Aerodynamics & Flight Mechanics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 43858
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/43858
PURE UUID: f973f326-6c6e-41d4-b1dd-93daa7eaedd7

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Date deposited: 01 Feb 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:08

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Contributors

Author: Guy Gratton
Author: Simon Newman

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