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Socioeconomic risk factors for labour induction in the United Kingdom

Socioeconomic risk factors for labour induction in the United Kingdom
Socioeconomic risk factors for labour induction in the United Kingdom
Objectives
Labour induction is a childbirth intervention experienced by a growing number of women globally each year. While the maternal and socioeconomic indicators of labour induction are well documented in countries like the United States, considerably less research has been done into which women have a higher likelihood of labour induction in the United Kingdom. This paper explores the relationship between labour induction and maternal demographic, socioeconomic, and health indicators by parity in the United Kingdom.

Method
Logistic regression analyses were conducted using the first sweep of the Millennium Cohort Study, including a wide range of socioeconomic factors such as maternal educational attainment, marital status, and electoral ward deprivation, in addition to maternal and infant health indicators.

Results
Multiparous women with fewer educational qualifications and those living in disadvantaged places had a greater likelihood of labour induction than women with higher qualifications and women in advantaged electoral wards. There were no significant associations between educational qualifications and induction of labour in nulliparous women.

Conclusions
This paper highlights which UK women are at higher risk of labour induction and how this risk varies by socioeconomic status, demonstrating that less advantaged women are more likely to experience labour induction. This evidence could help health care professionals identify which patients may be at higher risk of childbirth intervention.
Childbirth intervention, Health care, Labour induction, Maternal health
1471-2393
Carter, Sarah
a5111bba-b67c-47ec-b74a-b0bcef477fe6
Channon, Amos
5a60607c-6861-4960-a81d-504169d5880c
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Carter, Sarah
a5111bba-b67c-47ec-b74a-b0bcef477fe6
Channon, Amos
5a60607c-6861-4960-a81d-504169d5880c
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde

Carter, Sarah, Channon, Amos and Berrington, Ann (2020) Socioeconomic risk factors for labour induction in the United Kingdom. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, vol 20 (1), [146]. (doi:10.1186/s12884-020-2840-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives
Labour induction is a childbirth intervention experienced by a growing number of women globally each year. While the maternal and socioeconomic indicators of labour induction are well documented in countries like the United States, considerably less research has been done into which women have a higher likelihood of labour induction in the United Kingdom. This paper explores the relationship between labour induction and maternal demographic, socioeconomic, and health indicators by parity in the United Kingdom.

Method
Logistic regression analyses were conducted using the first sweep of the Millennium Cohort Study, including a wide range of socioeconomic factors such as maternal educational attainment, marital status, and electoral ward deprivation, in addition to maternal and infant health indicators.

Results
Multiparous women with fewer educational qualifications and those living in disadvantaged places had a greater likelihood of labour induction than women with higher qualifications and women in advantaged electoral wards. There were no significant associations between educational qualifications and induction of labour in nulliparous women.

Conclusions
This paper highlights which UK women are at higher risk of labour induction and how this risk varies by socioeconomic status, demonstrating that less advantaged women are more likely to experience labour induction. This evidence could help health care professionals identify which patients may be at higher risk of childbirth intervention.

Text
Labour Induction PCBH accepted - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 February 2020
Published date: 6 March 2020
Keywords: Childbirth intervention, Health care, Labour induction, Maternal health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438738
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438738
ISSN: 1471-2393
PURE UUID: 96d636f3-5b07-46a7-a7aa-67d712dc33c7
ORCID for Amos Channon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4855-0418
ORCID for Ann Berrington: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1683-6668

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Mar 2020 17:38
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:48

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Contributors

Author: Sarah Carter
Author: Amos Channon ORCID iD
Author: Ann Berrington ORCID iD

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