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Virus load and neuropathology in the FIV model

Virus load and neuropathology in the FIV model
Virus load and neuropathology in the FIV model

The FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) induces in cats brain changes presenting similarities with those observed in human immunodeficiency virus infection. This FIV model was used to study the relationship between viral load in brain, in lymphoid organs and central nervous system (CNS) changes during the early and late stages of infection. Early brain changes were analyzed in animals experimentally infected with two different FIV isolates and sacrificed at 7 and 15 days, 1, 2, 6, and 12 months post inoculation (p.i.). Late CNS abnormalities were analyzed in naturally FIV-infected cats referred to the Veterinary School of Nantes. For each animal, one cerebral hemisphere was fixed and examined using routine techniques. The characterization of FIV replicating cells by in situ hybridization was performed on the other half frozen hemisphere on sections performed in the anterior and the median regions of the brain. During the early stages of infection, moderate gliosis with glial nodules and sometimes white matter pallor and meningitis were associated with few infected cells scattered in the brain. Infection was an early event as infected cells could be detected in brain at 7 p.i. For each cat, these findings were found identical in the two analyzed areas. During the late stages, brain lesions and the number of virus replicating cells increased especially in animals with perivascular infiltrates. The multinucleated giant cells encephalitis was never observed and the number of FIV replicating cells scattered in the whole brain was always low. This discrepancy between the number of replicating cells and the brain lesions, corroborates the hypotheses suggesting that brain injuries may be mediated via diffusive factors and amplification processes cytokine cascades and cell activations.

FIV, Neuropathology, Viral load
1355-0284
377-387
Boche, Delphine
bdcca10e-6302-4dd0-919f-67218f7e0d61
Hurtrel, Maryse
9641f3f9-ddbf-44dc-9300-07689bbefc6c
Gray, Francoise
863ce1c9-7cfa-49be-88c1-5534bf45991e
Claessens-Maire, Marie Annick
42c8074b-8638-460d-8ac8-dbf8390a0b36
Ganière, Jean Pierre
daf138c9-db6d-4702-9485-2557a21046f1
Montagnier, Luc
80c2ecb7-a62e-4b81-a1dd-5438bc61f05f
Hurtrel, Bruno
6798d5fc-3ad6-431f-89d7-f269f9a17c4f
Boche, Delphine
bdcca10e-6302-4dd0-919f-67218f7e0d61
Hurtrel, Maryse
9641f3f9-ddbf-44dc-9300-07689bbefc6c
Gray, Francoise
863ce1c9-7cfa-49be-88c1-5534bf45991e
Claessens-Maire, Marie Annick
42c8074b-8638-460d-8ac8-dbf8390a0b36
Ganière, Jean Pierre
daf138c9-db6d-4702-9485-2557a21046f1
Montagnier, Luc
80c2ecb7-a62e-4b81-a1dd-5438bc61f05f
Hurtrel, Bruno
6798d5fc-3ad6-431f-89d7-f269f9a17c4f

Boche, Delphine, Hurtrel, Maryse, Gray, Francoise, Claessens-Maire, Marie Annick, Ganière, Jean Pierre, Montagnier, Luc and Hurtrel, Bruno (1996) Virus load and neuropathology in the FIV model. Journal of Neurovirology, 2 (6), 377-387. (doi:10.3109/13550289609146903).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus) induces in cats brain changes presenting similarities with those observed in human immunodeficiency virus infection. This FIV model was used to study the relationship between viral load in brain, in lymphoid organs and central nervous system (CNS) changes during the early and late stages of infection. Early brain changes were analyzed in animals experimentally infected with two different FIV isolates and sacrificed at 7 and 15 days, 1, 2, 6, and 12 months post inoculation (p.i.). Late CNS abnormalities were analyzed in naturally FIV-infected cats referred to the Veterinary School of Nantes. For each animal, one cerebral hemisphere was fixed and examined using routine techniques. The characterization of FIV replicating cells by in situ hybridization was performed on the other half frozen hemisphere on sections performed in the anterior and the median regions of the brain. During the early stages of infection, moderate gliosis with glial nodules and sometimes white matter pallor and meningitis were associated with few infected cells scattered in the brain. Infection was an early event as infected cells could be detected in brain at 7 p.i. For each cat, these findings were found identical in the two analyzed areas. During the late stages, brain lesions and the number of virus replicating cells increased especially in animals with perivascular infiltrates. The multinucleated giant cells encephalitis was never observed and the number of FIV replicating cells scattered in the whole brain was always low. This discrepancy between the number of replicating cells and the brain lesions, corroborates the hypotheses suggesting that brain injuries may be mediated via diffusive factors and amplification processes cytokine cascades and cell activations.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 1996
Keywords: FIV, Neuropathology, Viral load

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438814
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438814
ISSN: 1355-0284
PURE UUID: 221ca7ca-4a98-496e-866c-7c4b49a540d9
ORCID for Delphine Boche: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5884-130X

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Date deposited: 24 Mar 2020 17:52
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:03

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Contributors

Author: Delphine Boche ORCID iD
Author: Maryse Hurtrel
Author: Francoise Gray
Author: Marie Annick Claessens-Maire
Author: Jean Pierre Ganière
Author: Luc Montagnier
Author: Bruno Hurtrel

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