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Climate change, sea level rise and maritime baselines: responding to the plight of low-lying Atoll states

Climate change, sea level rise and maritime baselines: responding to the plight of low-lying Atoll states
Climate change, sea level rise and maritime baselines: responding to the plight of low-lying Atoll states
Predicted sea level rise caused by anthropogenic climate change threatens to drastically alter coastlines around the world. In the case of low-lying atoll states it threatens to expunge them from the map. This potential scenario has engendered considerable discussion concerning the fate of climate refugees. There has been relatively little attention, however, given to the impact of sea level rise on existing maritime zones and how these zones, and the resources they represent, might continue to benefit displaced communities. This article builds on the small body of legal scholarship that has taken this matter seriously, to provide a normative analysis, based on principles of global justice, of the best ways of responding to the plight of atoll states. The article thus makes a dual contribution: it extends legal scholarship by applying the principles of global justice to the problem of maritime boundaries, and contributes to the literature on global justice by investigating a salient but hitherto neglected case.
1526-3800
Armstrong, Christopher
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Armstrong, Christopher
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2

Armstrong, Christopher and Corbett, Jack (2020) Climate change, sea level rise and maritime baselines: responding to the plight of low-lying Atoll states. Global Environmental Politics. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Predicted sea level rise caused by anthropogenic climate change threatens to drastically alter coastlines around the world. In the case of low-lying atoll states it threatens to expunge them from the map. This potential scenario has engendered considerable discussion concerning the fate of climate refugees. There has been relatively little attention, however, given to the impact of sea level rise on existing maritime zones and how these zones, and the resources they represent, might continue to benefit displaced communities. This article builds on the small body of legal scholarship that has taken this matter seriously, to provide a normative analysis, based on principles of global justice, of the best ways of responding to the plight of atoll states. The article thus makes a dual contribution: it extends legal scholarship by applying the principles of global justice to the problem of maritime boundaries, and contributes to the literature on global justice by investigating a salient but hitherto neglected case.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 March 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 438835
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/438835
ISSN: 1526-3800
PURE UUID: 495fb71d-eedb-43b3-9984-0daf7515048e
ORCID for Christopher Armstrong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7462-5316
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Mar 2020 17:31
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:08

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