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Japanese residential care quality and perceived competency in institutionalized adolescents: a preliminary assessment of the dimensionality of care provision

Japanese residential care quality and perceived competency in institutionalized adolescents: a preliminary assessment of the dimensionality of care provision
Japanese residential care quality and perceived competency in institutionalized adolescents: a preliminary assessment of the dimensionality of care provision
Although early institutionalization has been shown to have broad, detrimental effects on child developmental outcomes, there have been few attempts to systematic measure which aspects of the institution and caregiving environment associate with negative psychological outcomes. The current study uses a culturally and contextually modified early adolescent version of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory (EA-HOME-JP) in Japanese child welfare institutions (CWIs) to provide preliminary data on relevant variables in the caregiving environment that associate with domains of perceived self-competency. Forty-six children and young people (Agemean = 13 years 9 months) and their 35 primary caregivers from 11 CWIs were interviewed using EA-HOME-JP. Children and young people also self-reported on their perceived cognitive, physical, social competencies, and sense of self-worth. Participants within the same residential environments exhibited marked variation across each EA-HOME-JP subscale suggesting that the same rearing environment can be experienced differently by different individuals. Interestingly, EA-HOME-JP scores did not vary with care type (large-ward, middle-ward, and family-like), Instead, CWIs grouped within the same care type showed significant variation to one another on EA-HOME-JP subscales. Importantly, EA-HOME-JP scores, rather than care type, associated with aspects of competency (cognitive competency and sense of self-worth). As these findings are based on a small number of participants, they will require further replication in larger samples ascertained from other regions in Japan. Ultimately, these data may contribute to considerations over optimal packages of residential rearing in Japan.
204-212
Zhang, Yuning
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Tanaka, Emiko
b177fef2-e61e-4b2c-8437-503a302be01e
Tokie, Anme
dde34020-7d78-4e58-917d-d1d52ee7fb15
Mori, Shigeyuki
bdbffc7a-33fd-44a9-9807-254a93c627b9
Bradley, Robert
f89d7dc2-f539-49d1-bfdb-048172a2784e
Lau, Jennifer
1c353b2b-b60d-4ee8-980e-c877dba57a63
Zhang, Yuning
d04a3a32-daa7-4441-8bdf-9bbaeb44583f
Tanaka, Emiko
b177fef2-e61e-4b2c-8437-503a302be01e
Tokie, Anme
dde34020-7d78-4e58-917d-d1d52ee7fb15
Mori, Shigeyuki
bdbffc7a-33fd-44a9-9807-254a93c627b9
Bradley, Robert
f89d7dc2-f539-49d1-bfdb-048172a2784e
Lau, Jennifer
1c353b2b-b60d-4ee8-980e-c877dba57a63

Zhang, Yuning, Tanaka, Emiko, Tokie, Anme, Mori, Shigeyuki, Bradley, Robert and Lau, Jennifer (2018) Japanese residential care quality and perceived competency in institutionalized adolescents: a preliminary assessment of the dimensionality of care provision. Children and Youth Services Review, 91, 204-212. (doi:10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.05.013).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although early institutionalization has been shown to have broad, detrimental effects on child developmental outcomes, there have been few attempts to systematic measure which aspects of the institution and caregiving environment associate with negative psychological outcomes. The current study uses a culturally and contextually modified early adolescent version of the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory (EA-HOME-JP) in Japanese child welfare institutions (CWIs) to provide preliminary data on relevant variables in the caregiving environment that associate with domains of perceived self-competency. Forty-six children and young people (Agemean = 13 years 9 months) and their 35 primary caregivers from 11 CWIs were interviewed using EA-HOME-JP. Children and young people also self-reported on their perceived cognitive, physical, social competencies, and sense of self-worth. Participants within the same residential environments exhibited marked variation across each EA-HOME-JP subscale suggesting that the same rearing environment can be experienced differently by different individuals. Interestingly, EA-HOME-JP scores did not vary with care type (large-ward, middle-ward, and family-like), Instead, CWIs grouped within the same care type showed significant variation to one another on EA-HOME-JP subscales. Importantly, EA-HOME-JP scores, rather than care type, associated with aspects of competency (cognitive competency and sense of self-worth). As these findings are based on a small number of participants, they will require further replication in larger samples ascertained from other regions in Japan. Ultimately, these data may contribute to considerations over optimal packages of residential rearing in Japan.

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Accepted/In Press date: 10 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 May 2018
Published date: August 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439028
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439028
PURE UUID: 0fb381d8-a9cc-4acf-8622-d7fce6a5b020
ORCID for Yuning Zhang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2225-6368

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Date deposited: 01 Apr 2020 16:32
Last modified: 20 May 2020 01:03

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Contributors

Author: Yuning Zhang ORCID iD
Author: Emiko Tanaka
Author: Anme Tokie
Author: Shigeyuki Mori
Author: Robert Bradley
Author: Jennifer Lau

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