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COVID-19 and liver dysfunction: current insights and emergent therapeutic strategies

COVID-19 and liver dysfunction: current insights and emergent therapeutic strategies
COVID-19 and liver dysfunction: current insights and emergent therapeutic strategies
The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has attracted increasing worldwide attention. Cases of liver damage or dysfunction (mainly characterized by moderately elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase levels) have been reported among patients with COVID-19. However, it is currently uncertain whether the COVID-19-related liver damage/dysfunction is mainly due to the viral infection per se or other coexisting conditions, such as the use of potentially hepatotoxic drugs and the coexistence of systemic inflammatory response, respiratory distress syndrome-induced hypoxia and multiple organ dysfunction. Based on the current evidence from case reports and case series, this review article focuses on the demographic and clinicalcharacteristics, potential mechanisms, and treatment options for COVID-19-related liver dysfunction. This review also describes the geographical and demographic distribution of COVID-19-related liver dysfunction, as well as possible underlying mechanisms linking COVID-19 to liver dysfunction, in order to facilitate future drug development, prevention and control measures for COVID-19
COVID-19, Liver dysfunction, SARS-CoV-2
18-24
Feng, Gong
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Zheng, Kenneth I.
fc58f302-a698-45dc-b263-a1ec15cf7489
Yan, Qin-Qin
818f5f7c-d964-4e6d-bf0a-c724498109a5
Rios, Rafael S.
17c4ed14-74f6-4d89-aa74-2a1c9fe2d291
Targher, Giovanni
043e0811-b389-4922-974e-22e650212c5f
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Poucke, Sven Van
b1f6d731-71bd-4948-9a63-aa41b74713fb
Liu, Wen-Yue
bc289152-30ab-4e13-830b-e6103e843bad
Zheng, Ming-Hua
bf6ad166-c59f-44c6-a30e-d3dd7459585c
Feng, Gong
8cffd01f-00cb-4b45-b862-71c4364de965
Zheng, Kenneth I.
fc58f302-a698-45dc-b263-a1ec15cf7489
Yan, Qin-Qin
818f5f7c-d964-4e6d-bf0a-c724498109a5
Rios, Rafael S.
17c4ed14-74f6-4d89-aa74-2a1c9fe2d291
Targher, Giovanni
043e0811-b389-4922-974e-22e650212c5f
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Poucke, Sven Van
b1f6d731-71bd-4948-9a63-aa41b74713fb
Liu, Wen-Yue
bc289152-30ab-4e13-830b-e6103e843bad
Zheng, Ming-Hua
bf6ad166-c59f-44c6-a30e-d3dd7459585c

Feng, Gong, Zheng, Kenneth I., Yan, Qin-Qin, Rios, Rafael S., Targher, Giovanni, Byrne, Christopher, Poucke, Sven Van, Liu, Wen-Yue and Zheng, Ming-Hua (2020) COVID-19 and liver dysfunction: current insights and emergent therapeutic strategies. Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology, 8 (1), 18-24. (doi:10.14218/JCTH.2020.00018).

Record type: Review

Abstract

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has attracted increasing worldwide attention. Cases of liver damage or dysfunction (mainly characterized by moderately elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase levels) have been reported among patients with COVID-19. However, it is currently uncertain whether the COVID-19-related liver damage/dysfunction is mainly due to the viral infection per se or other coexisting conditions, such as the use of potentially hepatotoxic drugs and the coexistence of systemic inflammatory response, respiratory distress syndrome-induced hypoxia and multiple organ dysfunction. Based on the current evidence from case reports and case series, this review article focuses on the demographic and clinicalcharacteristics, potential mechanisms, and treatment options for COVID-19-related liver dysfunction. This review also describes the geographical and demographic distribution of COVID-19-related liver dysfunction, as well as possible underlying mechanisms linking COVID-19 to liver dysfunction, in order to facilitate future drug development, prevention and control measures for COVID-19

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Accepted/In Press date: 27 March 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 March 2020
Published date: March 2020
Keywords: COVID-19, Liver dysfunction, SARS-CoV-2

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439050
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439050
PURE UUID: f0262972-fb86-405e-b786-ae8dedeea1fd
ORCID for Christopher Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Apr 2020 16:31
Last modified: 28 Apr 2022 01:45

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Contributors

Author: Gong Feng
Author: Kenneth I. Zheng
Author: Qin-Qin Yan
Author: Rafael S. Rios
Author: Giovanni Targher
Author: Sven Van Poucke
Author: Wen-Yue Liu
Author: Ming-Hua Zheng

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