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Similarities in color preferences between women and men: the case of the hunter gatherer Hadza tribe from Tanzania

Similarities in color preferences between women and men: the case of the hunter gatherer Hadza tribe from Tanzania
Similarities in color preferences between women and men: the case of the hunter gatherer Hadza tribe from Tanzania
Evidence for cross-cultural patterns of sexual differences in color preferences raised the question of whether these preferences are determined by universal principles. To address this question, we investigated most- and least-favorite color choices in a nonindustrialized community, the Hadza that has an egalitarian hunter-gatherer culture, fundamentally different from those previously investigated. We also compared color preference patterns in the Hadza with published data from Poland and Papua. Our results show that Hadza have very different color preferences than Polish and Papuan Yali respondents. Unlike many industrialized and nonindustrialized cultures, Hadza color preferences are practically the same for women and men. These observations question the idea of universal differences of color preferences between sexes and raise important questions about the determinants of color preferences.
428-436
Groyecka, Agata
2de20291-fe78-4110-983f-bad7ba5f7e95
Witzel, Christoph
dfb994f1-7007-441a-9e1a-ddb167f44166
Butovskaya, Marina
dc6a9140-b015-4cf0-a98b-f11e4d6362b2
Sorokowski, Piotr
0eeccf0c-8a6e-4ece-b628-dd0d70ba056f
Groyecka, Agata
2de20291-fe78-4110-983f-bad7ba5f7e95
Witzel, Christoph
dfb994f1-7007-441a-9e1a-ddb167f44166
Butovskaya, Marina
dc6a9140-b015-4cf0-a98b-f11e4d6362b2
Sorokowski, Piotr
0eeccf0c-8a6e-4ece-b628-dd0d70ba056f

Groyecka, Agata, Witzel, Christoph, Butovskaya, Marina and Sorokowski, Piotr (2019) Similarities in color preferences between women and men: the case of the hunter gatherer Hadza tribe from Tanzania. Perception, 48 (5), 428-436. (doi:10.1177/0301006619840937).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Evidence for cross-cultural patterns of sexual differences in color preferences raised the question of whether these preferences are determined by universal principles. To address this question, we investigated most- and least-favorite color choices in a nonindustrialized community, the Hadza that has an egalitarian hunter-gatherer culture, fundamentally different from those previously investigated. We also compared color preference patterns in the Hadza with published data from Poland and Papua. Our results show that Hadza have very different color preferences than Polish and Papuan Yali respondents. Unlike many industrialized and nonindustrialized cultures, Hadza color preferences are practically the same for women and men. These observations question the idea of universal differences of color preferences between sexes and raise important questions about the determinants of color preferences.

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Accepted/In Press date: 20 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 April 2019
Published date: May 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439126
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439126
PURE UUID: 8282c711-6175-403d-a6e7-48bdcb9b6d1f
ORCID for Christoph Witzel: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9944-2420

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Apr 2020 16:38
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:21

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Contributors

Author: Agata Groyecka
Author: Marina Butovskaya
Author: Piotr Sorokowski

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