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Robust principal component algorithms for high-order fast-sampled systems

Robust principal component algorithms for high-order fast-sampled systems
Robust principal component algorithms for high-order fast-sampled systems

Principal component active control is an important technique for noise and vibration reduction control problems. Most existing robust analysis regarding active control systems is based on the assumption of static open-loop behaviour, whose results can be very limited in practice. More promising results, exploiting integral quadratic constraints, have been reported recently and are more accurate and reliable for practical applications. However, depending on the nature of the system, such analysis may require one to establish the feasibility of an extremely large dimensional linear matrix inequality, effectively limiting the use of the result. This paper proposes an alternative approach, using model reduction methods, in which a set of IQC multipliers are obtained in a first step and the arising frequency domain inequality being verified in a second step. This two-step partition makes the approach much less computationally demanding for many complex practical systems. A detailed rotorcraft application is provided to illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach.

465-470
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Yang, Hao
6cdeb7bb-81d1-4a45-b3a0-0f0190c01a8a
Morales, Rafael M.
abe4cfe5-5e40-4e5f-bd6a-bf0f9ca4a434
Turner, Matthew C.
6befa01e-0045-4806-9c91-a107c53acba0
Yang, Hao
6cdeb7bb-81d1-4a45-b3a0-0f0190c01a8a
Morales, Rafael M.
abe4cfe5-5e40-4e5f-bd6a-bf0f9ca4a434
Turner, Matthew C.
6befa01e-0045-4806-9c91-a107c53acba0

Yang, Hao, Morales, Rafael M. and Turner, Matthew C. (2019) Robust principal component algorithms for high-order fast-sampled systems. In 2019 18th European Control Conference, ECC 2019. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. pp. 465-470 . (doi:10.23919/ECC.2019.8796281).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Principal component active control is an important technique for noise and vibration reduction control problems. Most existing robust analysis regarding active control systems is based on the assumption of static open-loop behaviour, whose results can be very limited in practice. More promising results, exploiting integral quadratic constraints, have been reported recently and are more accurate and reliable for practical applications. However, depending on the nature of the system, such analysis may require one to establish the feasibility of an extremely large dimensional linear matrix inequality, effectively limiting the use of the result. This paper proposes an alternative approach, using model reduction methods, in which a set of IQC multipliers are obtained in a first step and the arising frequency domain inequality being verified in a second step. This two-step partition makes the approach much less computationally demanding for many complex practical systems. A detailed rotorcraft application is provided to illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach.

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More information

Published date: 1 June 2019
Venue - Dates: 18th European Control Conference, ECC 2019, Italy, 2019-06-24 - 2019-06-27

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439211
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439211
PURE UUID: 35d7e0a3-53ff-4349-ab61-adf894e8187b

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Date deposited: 07 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 07 Apr 2020 16:30

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