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Galaxy size trends as a consequence of cosmology

Galaxy size trends as a consequence of cosmology
Galaxy size trends as a consequence of cosmology
We show that recently documented trends in galaxy sizes with mass and redshift can be understood in terms of the influence of underlying cosmic evolution; a holistic view which is complimentary to interpretations involving the accumulation of discreet evolutionary processes acting on individual objects. Using standard cosmology theory, supported with results from the Millennium Simulations, we derive expected size trends for collapsed cosmic structures, emphasizing the important distinction between these trends and the assembly paths of individual regions. We then argue that the observed variation in the stellar mass content of these structures can be understood to first order in terms of natural limitations of cooling and feedback. But whilst these relative masses vary by orders of magnitude, galaxy and host radii have been found to correlate linearly. We explain how these two aspects will lead to galaxy sizes that closely follow observed trends and their evolution, comparing directly with the Cosmic Evolution Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Thus we conclude that the observed minimum radius for galaxies, the evolving trend in size as a function of mass for intermediate systems, and the observed increase in the sizes of massive galaxies, may all be considered an emergent consequence of the cosmic expansion.
0035-8711
1570-1583
Stringer, M. J.
fb38e203-ffad-44de-8802-f0eeed09a006
Shankar, F.
b10c91e4-85cd-4394-a18a-d4f049fd9cdb
Novak, G. S.
efa13a1b-5253-42c1-803d-b1f0ff424bf7
Huertas-company, M.
0a864d45-6e9b-43cc-9db8-c25b0bb633ea
Combes, F.
f579a8bb-a74b-41fd-b046-d6084e59ee4a
Moster, B. P.
2fd88c53-9811-4470-93bd-627709886723
Stringer, M. J.
fb38e203-ffad-44de-8802-f0eeed09a006
Shankar, F.
b10c91e4-85cd-4394-a18a-d4f049fd9cdb
Novak, G. S.
efa13a1b-5253-42c1-803d-b1f0ff424bf7
Huertas-company, M.
0a864d45-6e9b-43cc-9db8-c25b0bb633ea
Combes, F.
f579a8bb-a74b-41fd-b046-d6084e59ee4a
Moster, B. P.
2fd88c53-9811-4470-93bd-627709886723

Stringer, M. J., Shankar, F., Novak, G. S., Huertas-company, M., Combes, F. and Moster, B. P. (2014) Galaxy size trends as a consequence of cosmology. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 441 (2), 1570-1583. (doi:10.1093/mnras/stu645).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We show that recently documented trends in galaxy sizes with mass and redshift can be understood in terms of the influence of underlying cosmic evolution; a holistic view which is complimentary to interpretations involving the accumulation of discreet evolutionary processes acting on individual objects. Using standard cosmology theory, supported with results from the Millennium Simulations, we derive expected size trends for collapsed cosmic structures, emphasizing the important distinction between these trends and the assembly paths of individual regions. We then argue that the observed variation in the stellar mass content of these structures can be understood to first order in terms of natural limitations of cooling and feedback. But whilst these relative masses vary by orders of magnitude, galaxy and host radii have been found to correlate linearly. We explain how these two aspects will lead to galaxy sizes that closely follow observed trends and their evolution, comparing directly with the Cosmic Evolution Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Thus we conclude that the observed minimum radius for galaxies, the evolving trend in size as a function of mass for intermediate systems, and the observed increase in the sizes of massive galaxies, may all be considered an emergent consequence of the cosmic expansion.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2014
Published date: 12 May 2014

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439293
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439293
ISSN: 0035-8711
PURE UUID: bbefbd64-faf2-4bda-98ee-3d5c729c0cb6

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Date deposited: 08 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 20 May 2020 16:34

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Contributors

Author: M. J. Stringer
Author: F. Shankar
Author: G. S. Novak
Author: M. Huertas-company
Author: F. Combes
Author: B. P. Moster

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