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Relationship between dysfunctional beliefs, self‐esteem, extreme appraisals, and symptoms of mania and depression over time in bipolar disorder

Relationship between dysfunctional beliefs, self‐esteem, extreme appraisals, and symptoms of mania and depression over time in bipolar disorder
Relationship between dysfunctional beliefs, self‐esteem, extreme appraisals, and symptoms of mania and depression over time in bipolar disorder
Objectives
Bipolar disorder (BD) is a mental health problem characterized by episodes of mania and depression which can lead to significant difficulties impairing one’s daily functioning. Cross‐sectional research has highlighted self‐esteem and dysfunctional beliefs in those with this diagnosis, but there has been little research into how self‐esteem and dysfunctional beliefs relate to symptoms of mania and depression over time.

Design
A secondary data analysis of a prospective cohort study was used.

Methods
Forty patients with BD attending a community adult mental health service completed the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale, Rosenberg Self‐Esteem Scale, Brief Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory, Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and Altman Self‐Rating Mania Scale at two time points 4 months apart.

Results
Cross‐sectional correlations revealed significant associations between elevated goal attainment dysfunctional beliefs and higher symptoms of mania; however, this did not hold over time. Elevated dependency‐related dysfunctional beliefs and lower self‐esteem were linked to higher symptoms of depression, and this relationship held over time. There was no impact of achievement‐related dysfunctional beliefs on mood. Extreme appraisals were correlated with higher depression symptoms at baseline, but this did not hold over time.

Conclusions
Findings suggest lower self‐esteem and specific dysfunctional beliefs around dependency may precede symptoms of depression. Further research is required to further explore these associations.
bipolar, bipolar affective disorder, Depression, Self-esteem, Dysfunctional Attitudes, Mania
1476-0835
Richardson, Thomas
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d
Atuk, Emel
39a6c977-eb13-4368-bf7e-f1da3defe356
Richardson, Thomas
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d
Atuk, Emel
39a6c977-eb13-4368-bf7e-f1da3defe356

Richardson, Thomas and Atuk, Emel (2020) Relationship between dysfunctional beliefs, self‐esteem, extreme appraisals, and symptoms of mania and depression over time in bipolar disorder. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice. (doi:10.1111/papt.12272).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives
Bipolar disorder (BD) is a mental health problem characterized by episodes of mania and depression which can lead to significant difficulties impairing one’s daily functioning. Cross‐sectional research has highlighted self‐esteem and dysfunctional beliefs in those with this diagnosis, but there has been little research into how self‐esteem and dysfunctional beliefs relate to symptoms of mania and depression over time.

Design
A secondary data analysis of a prospective cohort study was used.

Methods
Forty patients with BD attending a community adult mental health service completed the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale, Rosenberg Self‐Esteem Scale, Brief Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Predictions Inventory, Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and Altman Self‐Rating Mania Scale at two time points 4 months apart.

Results
Cross‐sectional correlations revealed significant associations between elevated goal attainment dysfunctional beliefs and higher symptoms of mania; however, this did not hold over time. Elevated dependency‐related dysfunctional beliefs and lower self‐esteem were linked to higher symptoms of depression, and this relationship held over time. There was no impact of achievement‐related dysfunctional beliefs on mood. Extreme appraisals were correlated with higher depression symptoms at baseline, but this did not hold over time.

Conclusions
Findings suggest lower self‐esteem and specific dysfunctional beliefs around dependency may precede symptoms of depression. Further research is required to further explore these associations.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 24 February 2020
Keywords: bipolar, bipolar affective disorder, Depression, Self-esteem, Dysfunctional Attitudes, Mania

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439367
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439367
ISSN: 1476-0835
PURE UUID: 826339b8-ede7-4e19-af00-880c831e95ee

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Apr 2020 16:35
Last modified: 20 May 2020 16:33

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Contributors

Author: Emel Atuk

University divisions

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