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Key considerations for finite element modelling of the residuum-prosthetic socket interface

Key considerations for finite element modelling of the residuum-prosthetic socket interface
Key considerations for finite element modelling of the residuum-prosthetic socket interface
Study Design:
Computational modelling

Background:
Finite element (FE) modelling has long been proposed to support prosthetic socket design. However, there is minimal detail in the literature to inform practice in developing and interpreting these complex, highly non-linear models.

Objectives:
To identify best practice recommendations for FE modelling of lower limb prosthetics, considering key modelling approaches and inputs.

Methods:
This study developed a parametric FE model using MRI data from a transtibial amputee. Comparative analyses were performed considering socket loading methods, socket-residuum interface parameters and soft tissue material models from the literature, to quantify their effect on the residual limb’s biomechanical response to a range of parameterised socket designs.

Results:
These variables had a marked impact on the FE model’s predictions for limb-socket interface pressure and soft tissue shear distribution.

Conclusions:
All modelling decisions should be justified biomechanically and clinically. In order to represent the prosthetic loading scenario in-silico, researchers should:
- consider the effects of donning and interface friction to capture the generated soft tissue shear stresses
- use representative stiffness hyperelastic material models for soft tissues when using strain to predict injury; and
- interrogate models comparatively, against a clinically-used control.

Clinical Relevance:
Recommendations for future FE models of residual limb-prosthetic socket interface are proposed, to assist researchers in building these models and clinicians in appraising them. Any clinical application of the predictions generated by these models must be rigorously scrutinised.
0309-3646
138-146
Steer, Joshua
b958f526-9782-4e36-9c49-ad48e8f650ed
Worsley, Peter
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Browne, Martin
6578cc37-7bd6-43b9-ae5c-77ccb7726397
Dickinson, Alexander
10151972-c1b5-4f7d-bc12-6482b5870cad
Steer, Joshua
b958f526-9782-4e36-9c49-ad48e8f650ed
Worsley, Peter
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Browne, Martin
6578cc37-7bd6-43b9-ae5c-77ccb7726397
Dickinson, Alexander
10151972-c1b5-4f7d-bc12-6482b5870cad

Steer, Joshua, Worsley, Peter, Browne, Martin and Dickinson, Alexander (2021) Key considerations for finite element modelling of the residuum-prosthetic socket interface. Prosthetics and Orthotics International, 45 (2), 138-146. (doi:10.31224/osf.io/k8dsg).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Study Design:
Computational modelling

Background:
Finite element (FE) modelling has long been proposed to support prosthetic socket design. However, there is minimal detail in the literature to inform practice in developing and interpreting these complex, highly non-linear models.

Objectives:
To identify best practice recommendations for FE modelling of lower limb prosthetics, considering key modelling approaches and inputs.

Methods:
This study developed a parametric FE model using MRI data from a transtibial amputee. Comparative analyses were performed considering socket loading methods, socket-residuum interface parameters and soft tissue material models from the literature, to quantify their effect on the residual limb’s biomechanical response to a range of parameterised socket designs.

Results:
These variables had a marked impact on the FE model’s predictions for limb-socket interface pressure and soft tissue shear distribution.

Conclusions:
All modelling decisions should be justified biomechanically and clinically. In order to represent the prosthetic loading scenario in-silico, researchers should:
- consider the effects of donning and interface friction to capture the generated soft tissue shear stresses
- use representative stiffness hyperelastic material models for soft tissues when using strain to predict injury; and
- interrogate models comparatively, against a clinically-used control.

Clinical Relevance:
Recommendations for future FE models of residual limb-prosthetic socket interface are proposed, to assist researchers in building these models and clinicians in appraising them. Any clinical application of the predictions generated by these models must be rigorously scrutinised.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

In preparation date: 8 November 2019
Submitted date: 14 November 2019
Accepted/In Press date: 29 September 2020
Published date: April 2021

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439468
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439468
ISSN: 0309-3646
PURE UUID: dd8dfda8-7e02-4d1c-89e4-786c47706e47
ORCID for Joshua Steer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6288-1347
ORCID for Peter Worsley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0145-5042
ORCID for Martin Browne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5184-050X
ORCID for Alexander Dickinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9647-1944

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Apr 2020 16:54
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 03:57

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