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Parent-child cultivation and children’s cognitive and attitudinal outcomes from a longitudinal perspective

Parent-child cultivation and children’s cognitive and attitudinal outcomes from a longitudinal perspective
Parent-child cultivation and children’s cognitive and attitudinal outcomes from a longitudinal perspective
This work adopts the concept of “concerted cultivation” (Lareau A. American Sociological Review 67(5), 747–776, 2002, 2003) to interpret how socioeconomic differentials in child rearing practices generate unequal children’s outcomes, distinguishing between children’s participation in organized leisure activities and children’s engagement in cognitively stimulating activities. Results show that it is the engagement in cognitively stimulating activities and not the participation in organized activities more generally that enhances children’s reading ability and the locus of control. Path analyses confirm that the selected dimensions of parent-child cultivation—parental expectations, direct stimulation, parental interactions with the school and children’s engagement in cognitively stimulating activities—mediate more than half of the socioeconomic gradient in children’s reading ability and the locus of control, even after controlling for the previous level of abilities. In addiction, the effect of parent-child cultivation is largely independent from and stronger than parental socioeconomic characteristics. The model is assessed on a large cohort sample (British Cohort Study 1970).
413-437
Pensiero, Nicola
a4abb10f-51db-493d-9dcc-5259e526e96b
Pensiero, Nicola
a4abb10f-51db-493d-9dcc-5259e526e96b

Pensiero, Nicola (2011) Parent-child cultivation and children’s cognitive and attitudinal outcomes from a longitudinal perspective. Child Indicators Research, 4, 413-437. (doi:10.1007/s12187-011-9106-6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This work adopts the concept of “concerted cultivation” (Lareau A. American Sociological Review 67(5), 747–776, 2002, 2003) to interpret how socioeconomic differentials in child rearing practices generate unequal children’s outcomes, distinguishing between children’s participation in organized leisure activities and children’s engagement in cognitively stimulating activities. Results show that it is the engagement in cognitively stimulating activities and not the participation in organized activities more generally that enhances children’s reading ability and the locus of control. Path analyses confirm that the selected dimensions of parent-child cultivation—parental expectations, direct stimulation, parental interactions with the school and children’s engagement in cognitively stimulating activities—mediate more than half of the socioeconomic gradient in children’s reading ability and the locus of control, even after controlling for the previous level of abilities. In addiction, the effect of parent-child cultivation is largely independent from and stronger than parental socioeconomic characteristics. The model is assessed on a large cohort sample (British Cohort Study 1970).

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 January 2011
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 February 2011
Published date: July 2011

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439536
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439536
PURE UUID: 5df5bdf2-c8a1-4f1e-94e8-22faf5033cdd
ORCID for Nicola Pensiero: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2823-9852

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Date deposited: 27 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:10

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