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The effects of upper‐secondary education and training systems on skills inequality. A quasi‐cohort analysis using PISA 2000 and the OECD survey of adult skills

The effects of upper‐secondary education and training systems on skills inequality. A quasi‐cohort analysis using PISA 2000 and the OECD survey of adult skills
The effects of upper‐secondary education and training systems on skills inequality. A quasi‐cohort analysis using PISA 2000 and the OECD survey of adult skills
Research tells us much about the effects of primary and lower‐secondary schooling on skills inequality, but we know less about the impact of the next stage of education. This article uses a differences‐in‐differences analysis of data on literacy and numeracy skills in PISA 2000 and SAS 2011/12 to assess the contribution of upper‐secondary education and training to inequalities in skills opportunities and outcomes. It finds that greater parity of esteem between academic and vocational tracks, as found in German‐speaking and Scandinavian countries, has some positive effects in mitigating skills inequality. However, the most important factors seem to be high completion rates from long‐cycle upper‐secondary education and training and mandatory provision of Maths and the national language in the curriculum.
0141-1926
756-779
Green, Andy
8a3d99e5-0a0a-4df0-8725-df42a39ce3df
Pensiero, Nicola
a4abb10f-51db-493d-9dcc-5259e526e96b
Green, Andy
8a3d99e5-0a0a-4df0-8725-df42a39ce3df
Pensiero, Nicola
a4abb10f-51db-493d-9dcc-5259e526e96b

Green, Andy and Pensiero, Nicola (2016) The effects of upper‐secondary education and training systems on skills inequality. A quasi‐cohort analysis using PISA 2000 and the OECD survey of adult skills. British Educational Research Journal, 42 (5), 756-779. (doi:10.1002/berj.3236).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Research tells us much about the effects of primary and lower‐secondary schooling on skills inequality, but we know less about the impact of the next stage of education. This article uses a differences‐in‐differences analysis of data on literacy and numeracy skills in PISA 2000 and SAS 2011/12 to assess the contribution of upper‐secondary education and training to inequalities in skills opportunities and outcomes. It finds that greater parity of esteem between academic and vocational tracks, as found in German‐speaking and Scandinavian countries, has some positive effects in mitigating skills inequality. However, the most important factors seem to be high completion rates from long‐cycle upper‐secondary education and training and mandatory provision of Maths and the national language in the curriculum.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 June 2016
Published date: 3 October 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439540
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439540
ISSN: 0141-1926
PURE UUID: 15f057de-2606-4ed1-a98b-c0ae73400dc5
ORCID for Nicola Pensiero: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2823-9852

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Date deposited: 27 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:10

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Contributors

Author: Andy Green
Author: Nicola Pensiero ORCID iD

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