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Design and fabrication of capillary-driven flow device for point-of-care diagnostics

Design and fabrication of capillary-driven flow device for point-of-care diagnostics
Design and fabrication of capillary-driven flow device for point-of-care diagnostics
Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics enables the diagnosis and monitoring of patients from the clinic or their home. Ideally, POC devices should be compact, portable and operatable without the requirement of expertise or complex fluid mechanical controls. This paper showcases a chip-and-dip device, which works on the principle of capillary-driven flow microfluidics and allows analytes’ detection by multiple microchannels in a single microchip via smartphone imaging. The chip-and-dip device, fabricated with inexpensive materials, works by simply dipping the reagents-coated microchip consisting of microchannels into a fluidic sample. The sample is loaded into the microchannels via capillary action and reacts with the reagents to produce a colourimetric signal. Unlike dipstick tests, this device allows the loading of bacterial/pathogenic samples for antimicrobial testing. A single device can be coated with multiple reagents, and more analytes can be detected in one sample. This platform could be used for a wide variety of assays. Here, we show the design, fabrication and working principle of the chip-and-dip flow device along with a specific application consisting in the determination of β-lactamase activity and cortisol. The simplicity, robustness and multiplexing capability of the chip-and-dip device will allow it to be used for POC diagnostics.
analytical chemistry, capillary-driven flow, colorimetry, lab-on-a-chip, microfluidics, optical detections, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, β-lactamase
2079-6374
Hassan, Sammer-Ul
8a5ae3f1-3451-4093-879e-85f40953da8b
Zhang, Xunli
d7cf1181-3276-4da1-9150-e212b333abb1
Hassan, Sammer-Ul
8a5ae3f1-3451-4093-879e-85f40953da8b
Zhang, Xunli
d7cf1181-3276-4da1-9150-e212b333abb1

Hassan, Sammer-Ul and Zhang, Xunli (2020) Design and fabrication of capillary-driven flow device for point-of-care diagnostics. Biosensors, 10 (4), [39]. (doi:10.3390/bios10040039).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics enables the diagnosis and monitoring of patients from the clinic or their home. Ideally, POC devices should be compact, portable and operatable without the requirement of expertise or complex fluid mechanical controls. This paper showcases a chip-and-dip device, which works on the principle of capillary-driven flow microfluidics and allows analytes’ detection by multiple microchannels in a single microchip via smartphone imaging. The chip-and-dip device, fabricated with inexpensive materials, works by simply dipping the reagents-coated microchip consisting of microchannels into a fluidic sample. The sample is loaded into the microchannels via capillary action and reacts with the reagents to produce a colourimetric signal. Unlike dipstick tests, this device allows the loading of bacterial/pathogenic samples for antimicrobial testing. A single device can be coated with multiple reagents, and more analytes can be detected in one sample. This platform could be used for a wide variety of assays. Here, we show the design, fabrication and working principle of the chip-and-dip flow device along with a specific application consisting in the determination of β-lactamase activity and cortisol. The simplicity, robustness and multiplexing capability of the chip-and-dip device will allow it to be used for POC diagnostics.

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Design and Fabrication of Capillary-Driven Flow Device Hassan2020 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 April 2020
Published date: 15 April 2020
Keywords: analytical chemistry, capillary-driven flow, colorimetry, lab-on-a-chip, microfluidics, optical detections, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, β-lactamase

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439545
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439545
ISSN: 2079-6374
PURE UUID: 63b0bfbd-c41f-4362-b1e2-0797e2055d94
ORCID for Sammer-Ul Hassan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0319-5814
ORCID for Xunli Zhang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4375-1571

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:52

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