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Out-of-school-time study programmes: do they work?

Out-of-school-time study programmes: do they work?
Out-of-school-time study programmes: do they work?
We analyse the prevalence and effectiveness of out-of-schooltime (OST) study programmes among secondary aged students, focusing on their potential for reducing socio-economic gaps in educational achievement. Compared to several extant studies, including the only prior study for Britain, whose findings could be affected by heterogeneous participation in the programmes, our results derive from a rich dataset with multiple controls for social background, personal motivation, and school characteristics. We find that programme participation in England is relatively low among students from families with long-term unemployed parents and those in routine occupations. Participation is also lower outside London, and especially outside large cities. Our results show that OST programmes, as long as they are teacher-led, are moderately effective in improving the academic performance at the end of lower secondary education as measured by the GCSE total score. Teacher-led OST programmes compensate for previous social disadvantage. The policy implications include a focus on expanding programme availability and on incentives for participation, and attention to the regional disparities.
0305-4985
127-147
Pensiero, Nicola
a4abb10f-51db-493d-9dcc-5259e526e96b
Green, Francis
7e67da4b-5ee8-4dd9-b62a-e1ae47fdf855
Pensiero, Nicola
a4abb10f-51db-493d-9dcc-5259e526e96b
Green, Francis
7e67da4b-5ee8-4dd9-b62a-e1ae47fdf855

Pensiero, Nicola and Green, Francis (2017) Out-of-school-time study programmes: do they work? Oxford Review of Education, 43 (1), 127-147. (doi:10.1080/03054985.2016.1240673).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We analyse the prevalence and effectiveness of out-of-schooltime (OST) study programmes among secondary aged students, focusing on their potential for reducing socio-economic gaps in educational achievement. Compared to several extant studies, including the only prior study for Britain, whose findings could be affected by heterogeneous participation in the programmes, our results derive from a rich dataset with multiple controls for social background, personal motivation, and school characteristics. We find that programme participation in England is relatively low among students from families with long-term unemployed parents and those in routine occupations. Participation is also lower outside London, and especially outside large cities. Our results show that OST programmes, as long as they are teacher-led, are moderately effective in improving the academic performance at the end of lower secondary education as measured by the GCSE total score. Teacher-led OST programmes compensate for previous social disadvantage. The policy implications include a focus on expanding programme availability and on incentives for participation, and attention to the regional disparities.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 November 2016
Published date: 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439553
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439553
ISSN: 0305-4985
PURE UUID: d5a911b2-ed9d-4f8e-9611-970abfefbff9
ORCID for Nicola Pensiero: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2823-9852

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Date deposited: 27 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:10

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Contributors

Author: Nicola Pensiero ORCID iD
Author: Francis Green

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