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Helping people to live well with chronic kidney disease

Helping people to live well with chronic kidney disease
Helping people to live well with chronic kidney disease
Reduced glomerular filtration rate and presence of albuminuria are both associatedwith increased risk of several poor outcomes. People with chronic kidney disease(CKD) also commonly suffer from lower quality of life than their aged-matched peers.The experiences reported by patients with CKD include being shocked by thediagnosis, being uncertain about the cause and worrying about progression and futuretreatment. Issues such as depression, pain and fatigue are common in people withCKD. Helping people to live well with a chronic condition like CKD should includeefforts to reduce the risk of adverse events occurring in the future, and consider whatcan be done to enhance quality of life now. As clinicians we can help people live wellwith CKD by being aware of the patient perspective, communicating clearly, andrecommending interventions that reduce future risk as well as recognising and treatingsymptoms. Assessing overall treatment burden is an important component ofmanagement and non-pharmacological interventions that may improve mobility,strength and pain should be considered.
Chronic, Quality of life, Renal insufficiency, Risk
1750-8460
Fraser, Simon
135884b6-8737-4e8a-a98c-5d803ac7a2dc
Taal, Maarten W.
10eeea62-a2fc-43b6-b5af-359e75c501ea
Fraser, Simon
135884b6-8737-4e8a-a98c-5d803ac7a2dc
Taal, Maarten W.
10eeea62-a2fc-43b6-b5af-359e75c501ea

Fraser, Simon and Taal, Maarten W. (2020) Helping people to live well with chronic kidney disease. British Journal of Hospital Medicine, 81 (6). (doi:10.12968/hmed.2020.0069).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Reduced glomerular filtration rate and presence of albuminuria are both associatedwith increased risk of several poor outcomes. People with chronic kidney disease(CKD) also commonly suffer from lower quality of life than their aged-matched peers.The experiences reported by patients with CKD include being shocked by thediagnosis, being uncertain about the cause and worrying about progression and futuretreatment. Issues such as depression, pain and fatigue are common in people withCKD. Helping people to live well with a chronic condition like CKD should includeefforts to reduce the risk of adverse events occurring in the future, and consider whatcan be done to enhance quality of life now. As clinicians we can help people live wellwith CKD by being aware of the patient perspective, communicating clearly, andrecommending interventions that reduce future risk as well as recognising and treatingsymptoms. Assessing overall treatment burden is an important component ofmanagement and non-pharmacological interventions that may improve mobility,strength and pain should be considered.

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Fraser_Taal_Live_well_with_CKD - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 April 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 June 2020
Keywords: Chronic, Quality of life, Renal insufficiency, Risk

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439573
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439573
ISSN: 1750-8460
PURE UUID: 2c8ebdd5-1384-41d1-8517-6e167f6c3d04
ORCID for Simon Fraser: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4172-4406

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Apr 2020 16:31
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 07:48

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Contributors

Author: Simon Fraser ORCID iD
Author: Maarten W. Taal

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