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Comorbidities and their link with individual health status: a cross-sectional analysis of 23,892 people with knee and hip osteoarthritis from primary care

Comorbidities and their link with individual health status: a cross-sectional analysis of 23,892 people with knee and hip osteoarthritis from primary care
Comorbidities and their link with individual health status: a cross-sectional analysis of 23,892 people with knee and hip osteoarthritis from primary care
Objectives: robust data on the impact of comorbidities on health in people with OA is lacking,despite its potential importance for patient management. Objectives were to determine coexisting conditions in people with OA in primary care, and whether more comorbidities were linked with individualhealth status. Methods: a retrospective analysisof 23,892 patients with knee and hip OA was conducted to determine comorbidities present (number/clusters), and how these linked with pain intensity (0-100), widespread pain (site numbers), medication usage (paracetamol, NSAIDs, opioids), quality of life (EQ-5D) and physical function (walking speed) using independent t-tests or chi-square test. Results: 62% of people with OA treated in primary care had at least one comorbidity; hypertension (37%), heart disease (8%) and diabetes (7%) being most common. Outcome measures worsened with more comorbidities (0 to 4+ comorbidities); Pain intensity [mean (SD)] 46(22) to 57(21); number of painful sites 3.7(3.0) to 6.3(5.4); quality of life 0.73(0.10) to 0.63(0.15); walking speed 1.57m/s(0.33) to 1.24m/s(0.31), while the proportion of people using pain medication increased from 0 to 2 comorbidities (58% to 69%; P<0.001), with an increase in opioid use from 4.6% to 19.5% with more comorbidities (0 to 4+ comorbidities). Conclusion: most people with knee or hip OA in primary care have at least one other long-term condition. A greater number of comorbidities is linked with worsening health, highlighting the importance of screening for comorbidities when treating patients with OA. It is important for clinicians to consider how OA treatments will interact and affect other common comorbidities.
Muckelt, Paul, Edward
b88d49fd-409d-49cb-8a32-8cd03dbb49b8
Roos, E.M.
29473993-811f-4044-a220-4d6a83b2175b
Stokes, Maria
71730503-70ce-4e67-b7ea-a3e54579717f
McDonough, S.
f28b947b-8f2a-4872-a160-102b86980e2b
Grønne, DT
60232c63-a080-4acc-8dab-bb49fadfb8a6
Ewings, Sean
326656df-c0f0-44a1-b64f-8fe9578ca18a
Skou, ST
a42f4e27-d3ba-413e-867e-7a892ccaa441
Muckelt, Paul, Edward
b88d49fd-409d-49cb-8a32-8cd03dbb49b8
Roos, E.M.
29473993-811f-4044-a220-4d6a83b2175b
Stokes, Maria
71730503-70ce-4e67-b7ea-a3e54579717f
McDonough, S.
f28b947b-8f2a-4872-a160-102b86980e2b
Grønne, DT
60232c63-a080-4acc-8dab-bb49fadfb8a6
Ewings, Sean
326656df-c0f0-44a1-b64f-8fe9578ca18a
Skou, ST
a42f4e27-d3ba-413e-867e-7a892ccaa441

Muckelt, Paul, Edward, Roos, E.M., Stokes, Maria, McDonough, S., Grønne, DT, Ewings, Sean and Skou, ST (2020) Comorbidities and their link with individual health status: a cross-sectional analysis of 23,892 people with knee and hip osteoarthritis from primary care. Journal of Comorbidity. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: robust data on the impact of comorbidities on health in people with OA is lacking,despite its potential importance for patient management. Objectives were to determine coexisting conditions in people with OA in primary care, and whether more comorbidities were linked with individualhealth status. Methods: a retrospective analysisof 23,892 patients with knee and hip OA was conducted to determine comorbidities present (number/clusters), and how these linked with pain intensity (0-100), widespread pain (site numbers), medication usage (paracetamol, NSAIDs, opioids), quality of life (EQ-5D) and physical function (walking speed) using independent t-tests or chi-square test. Results: 62% of people with OA treated in primary care had at least one comorbidity; hypertension (37%), heart disease (8%) and diabetes (7%) being most common. Outcome measures worsened with more comorbidities (0 to 4+ comorbidities); Pain intensity [mean (SD)] 46(22) to 57(21); number of painful sites 3.7(3.0) to 6.3(5.4); quality of life 0.73(0.10) to 0.63(0.15); walking speed 1.57m/s(0.33) to 1.24m/s(0.31), while the proportion of people using pain medication increased from 0 to 2 comorbidities (58% to 69%; P<0.001), with an increase in opioid use from 4.6% to 19.5% with more comorbidities (0 to 4+ comorbidities). Conclusion: most people with knee or hip OA in primary care have at least one other long-term condition. A greater number of comorbidities is linked with worsening health, highlighting the importance of screening for comorbidities when treating patients with OA. It is important for clinicians to consider how OA treatments will interact and affect other common comorbidities.

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Comorbidities and their link with individual health status a cross-sectional analysis of 23,892 people with knee and hip osteoarthritis from primary care - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 8 March 2020

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439612
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439612
PURE UUID: ab659512-0902-48e8-a55a-d7b891b1f63a
ORCID for Maria Stokes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4204-0890
ORCID for Sean Ewings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7214-4917

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Date deposited: 28 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 29 Jul 2020 01:38

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