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Recent developments in the processing of advanced materials using severe plastic deformation

Recent developments in the processing of advanced materials using severe plastic deformation
Recent developments in the processing of advanced materials using severe plastic deformation
The processing of bulk metals through the application of severe plastic deformation (SPD), using procedures such as equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT), is now well established for the fabrication of materials with exceptionally small grain sizes, usually in the submicrometer range and often having grain sizes at the nanometer level. These grain sizes cannot be achieved using thermo-mechanical processing or any conventional processing techniques. Recently, these procedures have been further developed to process alternative advanced materials. For example, by stacking separate disks within the HPT facility for the synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline metastable alloys where it is possible to achieve exceptionally high hardness, or by pressing powders or metallic particles in order to obtain new and novel nano-composites exhibiting unusual properties.
hardness, high-pressure torsion (HPT), nano-composites, severe plastic deformation, ultrafine grains
1662-9752
Kawasaki, M
e72a45f7-304f-410f-ac1e-55145d4923a5
Figueiredo, Roberto
184313b8-9f00-451a-bfb1-6d80a2c89b78
Langdon, Terence G
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86
Kawasaki, M
e72a45f7-304f-410f-ac1e-55145d4923a5
Figueiredo, Roberto
184313b8-9f00-451a-bfb1-6d80a2c89b78
Langdon, Terence G
86e69b4f-e16d-4830-bf8a-5a9c11f0de86

Kawasaki, M, Figueiredo, Roberto and Langdon, Terence G (2020) Recent developments in the processing of advanced materials using severe plastic deformation. Materials Science Forum, 1016. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The processing of bulk metals through the application of severe plastic deformation (SPD), using procedures such as equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT), is now well established for the fabrication of materials with exceptionally small grain sizes, usually in the submicrometer range and often having grain sizes at the nanometer level. These grain sizes cannot be achieved using thermo-mechanical processing or any conventional processing techniques. Recently, these procedures have been further developed to process alternative advanced materials. For example, by stacking separate disks within the HPT facility for the synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline metastable alloys where it is possible to achieve exceptionally high hardness, or by pressing powders or metallic particles in order to obtain new and novel nano-composites exhibiting unusual properties.

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Langdon-Plenary-THERMEC2020-submit-2 - Accepted Manuscript
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Text
Langdon-Plenary-THERMEC2020-submit-2 - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 April 2020
Keywords: hardness, high-pressure torsion (HPT), nano-composites, severe plastic deformation, ultrafine grains

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439627
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439627
ISSN: 1662-9752
PURE UUID: 8f56985a-a1d0-43a3-9192-f484b2146d88
ORCID for Terence G Langdon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3541-9250

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Apr 2020 16:35
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:59

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Contributors

Author: M Kawasaki
Author: Roberto Figueiredo

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