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Analogies in contextualizing human response to airborne ultrasound and fish response to acoustic noise and deterrents

Analogies in contextualizing human response to airborne ultrasound and fish response to acoustic noise and deterrents
Analogies in contextualizing human response to airborne ultrasound and fish response to acoustic noise and deterrents
In assessing the impact of sound on aquatic life, or its potential to guide fauna away from hazards, there is reliance on decades of human audiology, for example by adapting tests such as behavioral audiograms and Auditory Evoked Potentials. However, now that human audiology has translated over decades from research laboratories to the high-street hearing-aid dispenser, we might forget the underlying challenges that human audiology overcame, and which face its aquatic analogue because it is still in its infancy. A major challenge of researching effects of sound on fish comes from sparsity of data. One aspect of human audiology that shares this characteristic is the effect of Very High Frequency sound/ultrasound in air on humans. Their similarities will be discussed in terms of the difficulties associated with: lack of appreciation of the complexities of the sound field; lack of recognized calibrations and measurement procedures; reliance on the concept of a ‘typical’ subject based on an average; reliance on data from too few subjects; insufficient appreciation of group effects; reliance on a tacit assumption of an assumed mapping between threshold for hearing and threshold for behavioral/adverse effects; the tension between field and laboratory observations; and confusion caused by inexpert reporting.
fish, Acoustics, ultrasound in air, Adverse effects, humans
Leighton, Timothy
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Currie, Helen Ann Laura
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Holgate, Amelia
cb827aab-f36f-473c-b421-f640645d8531
Dolder, Craig
b08350be-fd09-4049-95bd-06a9c157a8bc
Lloyd Jones, Sian
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White, Paul
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Kemp, Paul
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Currie, Helen Ann Laura
d7b6bb3f-3d2f-44eb-81f2-c19c3d0f7c16
Holgate, Amelia
cb827aab-f36f-473c-b421-f640645d8531
Dolder, Craig
b08350be-fd09-4049-95bd-06a9c157a8bc
Lloyd Jones, Sian
0295b576-6de4-4d1d-b91a-96aee742fbcb
White, Paul
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Kemp, Paul
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7

Leighton, Timothy, Currie, Helen Ann Laura, Holgate, Amelia, Dolder, Craig, Lloyd Jones, Sian, White, Paul and Kemp, Paul (2020) Analogies in contextualizing human response to airborne ultrasound and fish response to acoustic noise and deterrents. In Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: POMA. vol. 37, 32 pp . (doi:10.1121/2.0001260).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In assessing the impact of sound on aquatic life, or its potential to guide fauna away from hazards, there is reliance on decades of human audiology, for example by adapting tests such as behavioral audiograms and Auditory Evoked Potentials. However, now that human audiology has translated over decades from research laboratories to the high-street hearing-aid dispenser, we might forget the underlying challenges that human audiology overcame, and which face its aquatic analogue because it is still in its infancy. A major challenge of researching effects of sound on fish comes from sparsity of data. One aspect of human audiology that shares this characteristic is the effect of Very High Frequency sound/ultrasound in air on humans. Their similarities will be discussed in terms of the difficulties associated with: lack of appreciation of the complexities of the sound field; lack of recognized calibrations and measurement procedures; reliance on the concept of a ‘typical’ subject based on an average; reliance on data from too few subjects; insufficient appreciation of group effects; reliance on a tacit assumption of an assumed mapping between threshold for hearing and threshold for behavioral/adverse effects; the tension between field and laboratory observations; and confusion caused by inexpert reporting.

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2019 Leighton POMA-Den Haag (Contexualization) with copyright notice - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 April 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 June 2020
Published date: 30 June 2020
Additional Information: This paper is a write-up of a plenary talk at the 2019 “Effects of noise on aquatic life” conference (Den Haag, The Netherlands, July 7-12, 2019), the unusual topic having been suggested to the main author by the organizing committee for its ability to provide an unorthodox perspective. This is therefore not a review of two fields, but an exploration of whether a multidisciplinary perspective can bring benefits to either.
Venue - Dates: Effects of noise on aquatic life: Fifth International Conference on the Effects of Noise on Aquatic Life, Den Haag, Netherlands, Netherlands, 2019-07-07 - 2019-07-12
Keywords: fish, Acoustics, ultrasound in air, Adverse effects, humans

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439652
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439652
PURE UUID: 86f8bc28-a762-4c64-a7b4-3b7da2c48c4c
ORCID for Timothy Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for Helen Ann Laura Currie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5792-3488
ORCID for Craig Dolder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0817-326X
ORCID for Paul White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4787-8713
ORCID for Paul Kemp: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4470-0589

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Apr 2020 16:30
Last modified: 19 Jun 2020 00:37

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Contributors

Author: Amelia Holgate
Author: Craig Dolder ORCID iD
Author: Sian Lloyd Jones
Author: Paul White ORCID iD
Author: Paul Kemp ORCID iD

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