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The prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in beta-thalassemia patients in Pakistan: a systematic review and meta-analysis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

The prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in beta-thalassemia patients in Pakistan: a systematic review and meta-analysis: A systematic review and meta-analysis
The prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in beta-thalassemia patients in Pakistan: a systematic review and meta-analysis: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Background
Hepatitis C virus infection is the most commonly reported bloodborne infection in Pakistan. Frequent blood transfusions in β-thalassemia patients expose them to a high risk of HCV infection. The purpose of this paper is to summarise the current data on the prevalence of HCV infection in β-thalassemia patients in Pakistan by using a systematic review and meta–analysis.

Methods
PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Sciences, the Cochrane Library, Directory of Open Access Journal and local databases were systematically searched for studies published between January 1st, 1995 and May 31st, 2019. Meta-analysis was performed using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects models with inverse variance weighting. The presence of publication bias was tested by Egger test, and the methodological quality of each included article was evaluated by the STROBE.

Results
We identified a total of 229 potential studies, of which 27 studies were finally considered in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of HCV in β-thalassemia patients in Pakistan was 36.21% (95% CI: 28.98–43.75%) based on 5789 β-thalassemia patients, but there was considerable heterogeneity. Meta-analysis estimated the HCV prevalence among the β-thalassemia patients at 45.98% (95% CI: 38.15–53.90%) in Punjab, 31.81% (95% CI: 20.27–44.59%) in Sindh, and 28.04% (95% CI: 13.58–45.26%) in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Meta–regression analysis showed that geographical location was a key source of heterogeneity.

Conclusions
The pooled prevalence of HCV in β-thalassemia patients in Pakistan was more than one in three, and higher than in neighbouring countries. It varies regionally within the country. With the use of standard prevention procedures during blood transfusion, the risk of HCV transmission in β-thalassemia patients could be controlled and the prevalence of HCV in β-thalassemia patients reduced.
HCV, Meta-analysis, Pakistan, Prevalence, Systematic review, β-Thalassemia
1471-2458
1-9
Akhtar, Sohail
f430b1be-297f-40b1-8730-a2dfa58e3a98
Nasir, Jamal
ca4fcb24-53d7-474f-aebb-b8b46b15f194
Hinde, Andrew
0691a8ab-dcdb-4694-93b4-40d5e71f672d
Akhtar, Sohail
f430b1be-297f-40b1-8730-a2dfa58e3a98
Nasir, Jamal
ca4fcb24-53d7-474f-aebb-b8b46b15f194
Hinde, Andrew
0691a8ab-dcdb-4694-93b4-40d5e71f672d

Akhtar, Sohail and Nasir, Jamal , Hinde, Andrew (ed.) (2020) The prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in beta-thalassemia patients in Pakistan: a systematic review and meta-analysis: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Public Health, 20 (1), 1-9, [587]. (doi:10.1186/s12889-020-8414-5).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Background
Hepatitis C virus infection is the most commonly reported bloodborne infection in Pakistan. Frequent blood transfusions in β-thalassemia patients expose them to a high risk of HCV infection. The purpose of this paper is to summarise the current data on the prevalence of HCV infection in β-thalassemia patients in Pakistan by using a systematic review and meta–analysis.

Methods
PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Sciences, the Cochrane Library, Directory of Open Access Journal and local databases were systematically searched for studies published between January 1st, 1995 and May 31st, 2019. Meta-analysis was performed using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects models with inverse variance weighting. The presence of publication bias was tested by Egger test, and the methodological quality of each included article was evaluated by the STROBE.

Results
We identified a total of 229 potential studies, of which 27 studies were finally considered in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of HCV in β-thalassemia patients in Pakistan was 36.21% (95% CI: 28.98–43.75%) based on 5789 β-thalassemia patients, but there was considerable heterogeneity. Meta-analysis estimated the HCV prevalence among the β-thalassemia patients at 45.98% (95% CI: 38.15–53.90%) in Punjab, 31.81% (95% CI: 20.27–44.59%) in Sindh, and 28.04% (95% CI: 13.58–45.26%) in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Meta–regression analysis showed that geographical location was a key source of heterogeneity.

Conclusions
The pooled prevalence of HCV in β-thalassemia patients in Pakistan was more than one in three, and higher than in neighbouring countries. It varies regionally within the country. With the use of standard prevention procedures during blood transfusion, the risk of HCV transmission in β-thalassemia patients could be controlled and the prevalence of HCV in β-thalassemia patients reduced.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 February 2020
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 April 2020
Published date: 29 April 2020
Keywords: HCV, Meta-analysis, Pakistan, Prevalence, Systematic review, β-Thalassemia

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 439678
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/439678
ISSN: 1471-2458
PURE UUID: aa187a10-82e6-422c-9faf-8dd2cc26760b
ORCID for Andrew Hinde: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8909-9152

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Apr 2020 16:31
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 05:16

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Contributors

Author: Sohail Akhtar
Author: Jamal Nasir
Editor: Andrew Hinde ORCID iD

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